• Students at South Peak

    Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller

    National Historical Park Vermont

Stories

Conservation Timeline

A visual look at the events that have shaped America's conservationist history, with a special emphasis on personalities associated with the park.

 

Stewardship Stories

Conservation in today's world is shaped by the grassroots efforts of people making conservation part of the fabric of their everyday lives. In partnership with the Orion Society, Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park interviewed a number of individuals who have put their conservationist vision into practice. Visitors to the park can view a series of photographic panels, which hang in the Carriage Barn Visitor Center, depicting some of these contemporary stories of stewardship. They are personal stories that speak to the spiritual connections made when people decide to take care of the places where they live, and while their circumstances may vary widely, the impulse to be good stewards and good citizens is universal.

The conservationists featured in the exhibit, entitled Conservation Stewardship: People Taking Care of Places, live in rural, urban, and suburban areas, and have gone about protecting their environments in a variety of ways. Click on the links below to read and hear them speak about their experiences.

 

Did You Know?

Black and white Carleton Watkins photograph, showing Yosemite's massive granite Cathedral Rock. Billings Family Archives.

Frederick Law Olmsted Sr. wrote to George Perkins Marsh in 1857, asking his advice on promoting "free soil" settlement in Texas to challenge the westward expansion of slavery. Strongly anti-slavery, both men would also champion land stewardship and public access to places like Yosemite Valley.