• Students at South Peak

    Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller

    National Historical Park Vermont

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  • Starting Wednesday July 23rd Expect Road Closures

    July 23rd, Prosper Trail, North Slope & Middle Pass Trails - west side of the park CLOSED for forestry operations. McKenzie Farm Trail & McKenzie Rd will remain open for access between Prosper Parking Lot and the Pogue. CAUTION Heavy Equipment in use!

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Three Generations of Stewardship

"The true importance of Marsh, Billings, and those who follow in their footsteps, goes beyond simple stewardship. Their work transcends maintenance. It involves new thought and new action to enhance and enrich...the past...We cannot rest on the achievements of the past. Rather each generation must not only be stewards, but activists, innovators, and enrichers." Laurance Rockefeller

The history of Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park is not only the history of a special house and property and the families who lived there. Rather, the park reflects a rich continuum of social history and land stewardship practices that continues to evolve.

As the property was handed down from generation to generation, so were George Perkins Marsh's revolutionary ideas about man's long-lasting effects on the environment.

Did You Know?

Black and white Carleton Watkins photograph, showing Yosemite's massive granite Cathedral Rock. Billings Family Archives.

In the early 1860s Vermonter Frederick Billings, then living in California, purchased and sent photographs of Yosemite Valley to influential eastern friends to make the case for its preservation. You can see these photographs, and paintings of Yosemite, at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP.