Lesson Plan

Building Stewardship Through Science - Mercury in Our Environment

Student sampling for mercury project
K Robbins

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Grade Level:
Ninth Grade-Tenth Grade
Subject:
Aquatic Studies, Chemistry, Climate Change, Ecology, Environment, Health, Landscapes, Physical Science, Science and Technology, Wildlife Biology
Duration:
6 months
Group Size:
Up to 24 (4-8 breakout groups)
Setting:
outdoors
National/State Standards:

Established Goal:
To have students become stewards of the land by conducting empirical research related to toxins in their local environment.


Keywords:
bioaccumulation, methylmercury, scientific method, hotspots, biomagnification, macroinvertebrates, abiotic, biotic, trophic levels, stewardship, social responsibility

Overview

By working with various partners, including Dartmouth College's Toxic Metals Research Program, students determine mercury levels in macroinvertebrates taken from the Pogue (pond) in Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP. Students learn how mercury moves through air, water, and through the food chain. By reading Marsh, learning about Billings and Rockefeller, students will cultivate a sense of stewardship and reflect on their own choices.

Objective(s)

To have students become stewards of the land by conducting empirical research related to toxins in their local environment.

Assessment

Performance Tasks:

Vimeo Presentation

Field Day

Poster Development

Poster presentation

Pre-tests/Post-tests

Self Assessments

Other Evidence:

Tests

Homework

Class Activities: labs, journals, etc…

Formative assessments

Common assessment

Park Connections

Marsh, Billings, Rockefeller, Stewardship



Vocabulary

Methylmercury, bioaccumulation, biomagnification, scientific method, hotspots, macroinvertebrates, abiotic, biotic, trophic levels, stewardship