• Students at South Peak

    Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller

    National Historical Park Vermont

November 30, 2012

March 08, 2013 Posted by: Marissa Jager

The season has been very busy, and has gone by so fast I've not remembered to blog. It's already late fall and the first little snow storm stuck to the ground last night. For my trails internship I've been working on a variety of projects through the summer and early fall and in the process I have learned a lot and accomplished a lot.

 In the last months of summer I worked with two trail crews on a unique trail restoration project, which was exciting and energizing. A 75 year old switchback trail in Woodstock is being restored and revamped to become an ADA wheelchair accessible trail. Along with surfacing 300 feet of trail with gravel the crews also constructed a 70 foot crib wall and a double lane switch back wide enough to allow two wheelchairs to pass one another on the trail. It's really an inspiring and one of a kind project.

Also during that time I helped develop and coordinate the first annual Peak to Peak hiking event; a celebration of trails, local history and hiking. Peak to Peak was hard work, but also rewarding and I am truly inspired by the community of organizations and individuals that worked to make the event a success.  Lately, I am working on more research and computer oriented projects, but I am still able to get outdoors quite often and help with resource management projects like invasive removal.

In my last entry I said I hoped that by the end of the year I would know the trails here like the back of my hand, and I believe I am beginning to. My boots have covered them all several times, be it for trail assessment, maintenance, invasive plant removal or just a leisurely hike. Next, I need to cover them all with my ski and snowshoe tracks. I'm pretty sure plenty of winter adventure awaits me.

~Marissa Jager, SCA Intern

trail restoration, ADA wheelchair accessibility, invasives




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Did You Know?

Autumn leaves, lit by the sun, carpet an uphill stretch of a carriage road. NPS Photo.

45 miles of carriage roads, an early 20th century gift of John D. Rockefeller Jr., weave around the granite mountains and valleys of Acadia NP. 14 miles of carriage roads, built in the 1880s by Frederick Billings, traverse the gentle slopes and historic woodlands of Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP.