• Pawtucket canal with boat tour full of visitors with trolley in the background.

    Lowell

    National Historical Park Massachusetts

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  • Credit Card payments for interpretive fees.

    Beginning September 9, due to the federal government's fiscal year close out, only cash or check payments can be accepted for fees at the Boott Mills, canal boat tours, and for Interagency Passes. Credit cards will be accepted again on October 1, 2014. More »

  • Lowell NHP Superintendents Compendium update.

    The Superintendents Compendium has been updated in regard to the use of unmanned aircraft in national park areas. More »

Lowell, In Our Own Words: Creative Writing Workshop Series

Ranger Joann
Ranger Joann leads a workshop
NPS/Phil Lupsiewicz

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News Release Date: June 21, 2013
Contact: Resi Polixa, 978-970-5025
Contact: Phil Lupsiewicz, 978-275-1705

LOWELL, MA —Everyone has a story. From19th century mill-worker Lucy Larcom to 20th century Jack Kerouac to the current day, many Lowellians have recorded their experiences and wrote themselves into history. Come share yours! How do you experience Lowell?

Discover the words of these local writers on their experiences of the city and engage in conversation about the past and present. Express your own history of Lowell through creative writing! Every Thursday at 12:30-2:00 p.m. from July 11 to August 22 (except August 1), join a ranger at Lowell National Historical Park for a series of creative writing workshops.

Our workshops will focus on our own experiences of women’s history (7/11 and 7/18), the environment (7/25 and 8/8), and immigration (8/15 and 8/22). Workshops are free, and writers of all experience levels and genres welcome. All workshops will start at the Boott Cotton Mills Museum, no reservations necessary.

For more information about the Boott Cotton Mills Museum and Lowell National Historical Park visit www.nps.gov/lowe or call 978-970-5000. 

Did You Know?

Industrial Canyon, Lowell, MA

Protests came to Lowell in the mid-1830s. Mill management...twice reduced the take-home pay of women workers. Faced with growing inventories and falling prices, owners believed the only way to sustain profits was to cut labor costs. The mill workers were not willing to accept this logic.