• Pawtucket canal with boat tour full of visitors with trolley in the background.

    Lowell

    National Historical Park Massachusetts

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  • Credit Card payments for interpretive fees.

    Beginning September 9, due to the federal government's fiscal year close out, only cash or check payments can be accepted for fees at the Boott Mills, canal boat tours, and for Interagency Passes. Credit cards will be accepted again on October 1, 2014. More »

  • Lowell NHP Superintendents Compendium update.

    The Superintendents Compendium has been updated in regard to the use of unmanned aircraft in national park areas. More »

Guided Tours and Programs at Lowell National Historical Park April 2011

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Date: March 30, 2011
Contact: Phil Lupsiewicz, 978-275-1705

Join Lowell National Historical Park Rangers as they present walks and talks on numerous aspects of Lowell's history, with a special emphasis this month on National Park Week, April 16 -20. These popular programs will be offered daily throughout April.

Daily Offerings2:30

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday "Waterpower in Lowell"

Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday "Locks to Locks"
Saturday, April 23, - "River Transformed Exhibit"

World events sometime make us pause to reflect on our country's industrial success and wonder how it was achieved. From April 2 to May 28, 2011, join a park ranger for a 90-minute tour from 2:30 PM 4:00 PM to explore how the early cotton textile industry in Lowell used waterpower to become a world class business model in the 19th Century and used human power to become a model of preservation today. On Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday the tour topic will be "Waterpower in Lowell" and will include a visit to the River Transformed turbine exhibit. Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday's tour will be "Locks to Locks" which will explore the canal system's development over the past 200 years. Tours begin at the Lowell National Historical Park Visitor Center, 246 Market St. For reservations call 978-970-5000.  Free of charge.

April 16-24 National Park Week

Visit Lowell National Historical Park and the Boott Cotton Mills Museum free of charge in celebration of National Park Week. Hear the roar of a 1920s weave room and visit exhibits that explore Lowell's industrial past. Kids can follow the "Discovery Trail" to learn about how cotton fiber is made into cloth or they can complete the Junior Ranger book and earn a badge! Free parking available at the Visitor Center at 246 Market Street. The National Park Visitor Center is open daily from 9:00 am 5:00 pm. The Boott Cotton Mills Museum is located at 115 John Street and is open daily from 9:30 am 4:30 pm daily.

April 16, 2011 

Sumter Surrenders! Volunteers called!1:00 pm.  Men of Lowell left their jobs to become citizen soldiers. "Join them" as they travel to defend Washington. Hear the cheers in northern cities and "witness" the attack in Baltimore by a mob of thousands. Join a Park Ranger to celebrate the 150th anniversary of this battle in this engaging and entertaining program. The program will be held at the Boott Cotton Mills Museum, 115 John Street. Free of Charge.

April 24, 2011

Junior Ranger Day All Day; Special Tour at 2:30 Suffolk Mill Bingo

Join a park ranger for a guided tour at 2:30 and participate in "Suffolk Mill Bingo" to explore the exhibit and win a prize! Visit the Boott Cotton Mills Museum and follow the "Discovery Trail" to learn how cotton cloth was made, complete the Junior Ranger Activity Book and earn a Junior Ranger badge, visit the Mill Girls & Immigrants Exhibit and ride the park's historic trolley. Start your visit at the Lowell National Historical Park Visitor Center at 246 Market Street. Call 978-970-5000 for tour reservations. All events are free of charge.

Did You Know?

Industrial Canyon, Lowell, MA

Protests came to Lowell in the mid-1830s. Mill management...twice reduced the take-home pay of women workers. Faced with growing inventories and falling prices, owners believed the only way to sustain profits was to cut labor costs. The mill workers were not willing to accept this logic.