• Pawtucket canal with boat tour full of visitors with trolley in the background.

    Lowell

    National Historical Park Massachusetts

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Lowell NHP Superintendents Compendium update.

    The Superintendents Compendium has been updated in regard to the use of unmanned aircraft in national park areas. More »

Fee Free Day at the Boott Cotton Mills Museum June 21

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: June 17, 2011
Contact: Phil Lupsieiwcz, 978-275-1705

Boott Cotton Mills Museum:

Fee Free Days for 2011

Lowell, MA Lowell National Historical Park is waiving museum fees at the Boott Cotton Mills Museum on Tuesday, June 21, 2011.Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced that the NPS will waive admission fees on selected dates throughout 2011 and encouraged all Americans to make a New Year's resolution to visit a national park this year. "In these tough economic times, our fee-free days will give families many opportunities to enjoy our nation's heritage and natural beauty in meaningful and affordable ways," he said.

The 2011 fee-free dates will be the first day of summer (June 21), National Public Lands Day (September 24), and the weekend of Veterans Day (November 11-13).

The Boott Cotton Mills Museum is open daily from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm at 115 John Street.Visitors are encouraged to begin their visit to the Park at the Visitor Center, 246 Market Street. While there, information is also available about many other park offerings and cultural attractions in the City.

For more information about Lowell National Historical Park visit www.nps.gov/lowe or call 978-970-5000. For information about national parks nationwide that are participating in fee free events during these same weekends, please visit http://www.nps.gov/npweek/

Did You Know?

Industrial Canyon, Lowell, MA

Protests came to Lowell in the mid-1830s. Mill management...twice reduced the take-home pay of women workers. Faced with growing inventories and falling prices, owners believed the only way to sustain profits was to cut labor costs. The mill workers were not willing to accept this logic.