• close up view of gate and parade ground of Fort Clatsop

    Lewis and Clark

    National Historical Park OR,WA

Amphibians

Pacific Giant Salamander

Pacific Giant Salamander

NPS PHOTO

The park's extensive and diverse wetlands support a relatively high number of amphibians. Of 11 confirmed species, fourare uncommon or rare. Imperiled due to habitat loss, Cope's giant salamander and the Columbia torrent salamanders are aquatic inhabitants of small cold streams. Pacific giant salamanders live in the park's small streams and adjacent moist forests. Northern red-legged frog, a federal species of concern, inhabit park forests and freshwater wetlands.

Park Amphibians

Northwestern Salamander
Ambystoma gracile

Cope's Giant Salamander
Dicamptodon copei

Pacific Giant Salamander
Dicamptodon tenebrosus

Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii

Dunn's Salamander
Plethodon dunni

Western Red-Backed Salamander
Plethodon vehiculum

Columbia Torrent Salamander
Rhyacotriton kezeri

Roughskin Newt
Taricha granulosa

Pacific Chorus (tree) frog
Pseudacris regilla

Northern Red-Legged Frog
Rana aurora aurora

Bullfrog
Rana catesbeiana

Did You Know?

Corps of Discovery

The average American man in the early 1800s was 5'5" or 5'6". Both Clark and Lewis were six feet tall though. Under most circumstances military recruits had to be at least 5'4" to join the army.