• photo of a replica keelboat with a crew member on the bow at sunset

    Lewis & Clark

    National Historic Trail ID,IL,IA,KS,MO,MT,NE,ND,OR,SD,WA

Outdoor Activities

Kayaking on the Missouri River.

NPS photo

Traveling the Trail
Use the following information and suggested resources to plan your journey along the Trail by car, bicycle, or boat.

Roads and highways run parallel to the Missouri and Columbia rivers, the water routes traveled by the Expedition. Most of these roads are marked by a rectangular sign showing Lewis and Clark. Information and maps in the following books may help you plan your route.

 
Drawing of a red car.

By car:
Along the Trail with Lewis and Clark, Second Edition
By Barbara Fifer and Vicky Soderberg with maps by Joseph Mussulman.
This book includes historical highlights and colorful road maps of the Trail and the Eastern Legacy sites.

Along the Trail with Lewis and Clark, Travel Planner and Guide
By Barbara Fifer
This guide covers from Camp Dubois to the Pacific coast and includes historical highlights, information about Trail sites, and colorful road maps.

Traveling the Lewis and Clark Trail 3rd Edition
By Julie Fanselow
This book includes information on activities, attractions, visitor amenities, and more for every state along the route.

National Geographic Guide to the Lewis & Clark Trail
By Thomas Schmidt
This work features many parks and other sites along the trail.

Lewis and Clark, The Trail of Discovery
Available in audiocassette and audio CD, this ten volume set is designed for those traveling the Lewis and Clark Trail. Each volume covers a different segment of the Trail. This series is produced by the Car Tours Foundation.

The Lewis & Clark Expedition: A Traveler's Companion for Oregon and Washington
By Stuart & Kathy Watson
The book provides detailed information on Expedition sites and events in Washington and Oregon.

 
Sketch of a bicycle

By bicycle:
Cyclosource
The 2003 Bicycle Map Catalog includes "Ride the Lewis & Clark Trail" with map and route information for bicyclists. This edition of Cyclosource, as well as other information about bicycling the Trail can be found at the Adventure Cycling Association web site.

Bicycling the Lewis & Clark Trail
Edited by Michael McCoy
Detailed maps, places of interest and mileage. Good also for auto travel.

Bicycle Guide to the Lewis & Clark Trail
By Tod Rodger
Detailed maps, trip planning, photos, and town descriptions.

 
Drawing of red kayak

By Boat:
Missouri River:
Missouri River Traveler's Guide and Journal
Produced by the Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha Disrict
The guide has safety, wildife, cultural resources, tribal contacts, and more. To order, contact Army Corps of Engineers, Ohama District at (402)221-3900.

Montana's Wild and Scenic Upper Missouri River
By Glen Monahan and Chanler Biggs
This is a guide to floating the upper Missouri River that includes historical information.

For photos of docks, ramps and landing places along the Missouri River plus list of services and links to boating sites visit the Missouri River Trips website.

For information about communities on the Missouri River, special projects, Lewis and Clark activities, important river-related links and the Missouri flotilla visit the Missouri River Communities website.

The BLM produces a boater's guide and set of two waterproof maps for the Upper Missouri River are available at the BLM's Upper Missouri River Breaks website. The maps cover Fort Benton to Slaughter River and Slaughter River to James Kipp Recreation Area.

Call the Army Corps of Engineers' Missouri River Information Center for maps and information at (866)285-3219.

Other rivers along the Lewis and Clark NHT:
For information about the Northwest Discovery Water Trail (NDWT) - which extends 367 miles from near Orofino, Idaho, on the Clearwater River, down the Snake and Columbia Rivers to Bonneville Dam - visit the NDWT web site.

Did You Know?

Near Great Falls, Montana

Today's Lewis and Clark NHT is the joint effort of many organizations and agencies. Although the Trail is administered by the NPS, sites along the Trail are managed by federal land management agencies, state, local, tribal, and private organizations. More...