• The calm, inviting waters of the Spokane Arm. Photo Credit: NPS\LARO\John Salisbury

    Lake Roosevelt

    National Recreation Area Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Fire Restrictions Now Include All Open Flame

    Due to extreme conditions, all fires at Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area are prohibited effective August 1, 2014, until further notice. No open flames are permitted. This includes but is not limited to wood fires, charcoal fires, and tiki torches More »

  • Enterprise Boat-in Campground Reopened

    Effective immediately, the Enterprise Boat-in Campground is open and available for camping on a first-come, first-served basis. More »

Support Your Park

View from the Kettle Falls trail. Autumn colored grasses, orange and brown, with rising pool of water in distance.

Kettle Falls trail in Autumn

L.Snook

The National Park Service cares for America's treasures, and you can help.

  • Be a good park visitor. Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints. Enjoy yourself and remember future visitors who will come after you hoping to enjoy these American treasures too.
  • Support stewardship of the park by becoming educated about the park's natural and cultural resources.
  • Be a volunteer. There's nothing more rewarding than warm thanks from visitors who you helped connect to the park and it's resources!
  • Support the park's bookstores. The park bookstores are run in cooperation with the Northwest Interpretive Association. Proceeds from book sales help fund exhibits and programs.
  • Keep informed on park issues and provide comment during park planning processes.
  • Be a good steward by obeying park regulations, including, but not limited to: picking up trash; keeping dogs leashed; leaving precious resources undisturbed, including artifacts; properly disposing of fishing lines and carcasses; and not using metal detectors.

Did You Know?

White Sturgeon of the Columbia River

Lake Roosevelt's sturgeon are 8 to 20 feet long. They are also at least 70 years old. In 1941, Grand Coulee Dam flooded the fast-moving waters they need to spawn. To help out the population, the state of Washington introduced new fish to the lake in 2006.