• The calm, inviting waters of the Spokane Arm. Photo Credit: NPS\LARO\John Salisbury

    Lake Roosevelt

    National Recreation Area Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Fire Restrictions Established at Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area

    In accordance with the 36 CFR §1.5(a)(1), Superintendent Dan Foster has established a restriction for campfires on the exposed lakebed. Campfires in park-provided fire grates at developed campgrounds are allowed. More »

Operating Hours & Seasons

Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area is open for recreational use 24 hours per day, 365 days per year.

Variable lake levels can lead to the closure of boat launches and the loss of water pressure in some campgrounds. During an average year, the Bureau of Reclamation brings the lake near full pool from mid-June until Labor Day. Check the current lake level and refer to the boat launch elevation guide before you visit, especially during the fall, winter, or spring.

Current operating hours are listed below.

VISITOR CENTERS
FORT SPOKANE VISITOR CENTER AND MUSEUM
Fort Spokane, NPS
(Memorial Day - Labor Day) Daily 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Rest of the year is by request.
Phone: (509) 754-7893

KETTLE FALLS INFORMATION CENTER
Kettle Falls, NPS, USFS & Kettle Falls Chamber of Commerce
New Hours (effective 4/23/2014 until further notice)
Wednesday 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Thursday - Sunday 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Phone: (509) 738-2300

Boat launch permits sales on Thursday through Sunday only at this location.

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES

LAKE ROOSEVELT NRA HEADQUARTERS
Headquarters, Coulee Dam, NPS
Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Closed federal holidays
Phone: (509) 754-7800

FORT SPOKANE DISTRICT OFFICE
District Office, Fort Spokane, NPS
Tues. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Closed federal holidays
Phone: (509) 754-7800

KETTLE FALLS DISTRICT OFFICE

District Office, Kettle Falls, NPS
Mon. - Fri. 7 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Closed federal holidays
Phone: (509) 754-7800

Did You Know?

Construction equipment for clearing the lakebed

When the Grand Coulee Dam was finished and the lake filled, 11 towns were submerged. Every structure was cleared or burned. Soon, the rising waters covered the forlorn concrete foundations with water and darkness. Some towns died, others were built above the new lake, replacing what was lost.