• Sunset at Lake Mead's Boulder Basin

    Lake Mead

    National Recreation Area AZ,NV

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Important Notice to Mariners

    Lake Mead water elevations will be declining throughout the summer. Before launching, check lake levels, launch ramp conditions, changes to Aids to Navigation and weather conditions by clicking on More »

  • Areas of Park Impacted by Storm Damage

    Strong storms rolled through Lake Mead National Recreation Area Aug. 3-4, causing damage to some areas of the park. Crews are working to restore the below locations. Debris may be present in other areas of the park, as well, especially in the backcountry. More »

  • Goldstrike Canyon, Arizona Hot Spring Trails Temporarily Closed

    A temporary emergency closure is in place for Goldstrike Canyon and Arizona Hot Spring trails within Lake Mead National Recreation Area, through Sept. 11. This closure includes National Park Service and Bureau of Reclamation lands. More »

  • Summer Fire Rules in Effect

    Lake Mead NRA is now enforcing summer fire restrictions. Please click 'more' to learn about the rules for fire during our hot, dry season. More »

Places To Go

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Lake Mead National Recreation Area is big, it's diverse and it's extreme. Temperatures can be harsh, from 120º Fahrenheit in the summer to well below freezing in winter on the high plateaus.

From the mouth of the Grand Canyon, the park follows the Arizona-Nevada border along what was formerly 140 miles of the Colorado River. The two big lakes-Mead and Mohave- are the big draw here.

Lake Mead is impressive: It's 1.5 million acres, 110 miles long when the lake is full, 550 miles of shoreline, around 500 feet at greatest depth, 255 square miles of surface, and when filled to capacity, 28 million acre-feet of water, about two years' flow of the Colorado River. Sixty-seven-mile-long Lake Mohave, formed by Davis Dam, still retains in its upper reaches some of the character of the old Colorado River.

Although much of Lake Mead must be experienced by boat, the various campgrounds, marinas, lodges, and other facilities clustered around the lake make it possible for non-boaters to enjoy it as well. Literally millions of people use the park each year, and many of these visitors return again and again to find that special cove, hiking trail or campground, or just to sit on the shore and enjoy solitude of a quality that only nature can supply.
 

Black Canyon
Explore the newest national water trail at Lake Mead NRA — canoeing, kayaking or rafting, through Black Canyon. This canyon is a wonderland of coves, caves, and hot springs.


Black Canyon Water Trail
Willow Beach
(Off site Link)
Black Canyon River Adventures
(Off site link)

Overton Arm
The Overton Arm is in the northern region of the park. It’s a tranquil finger of water fed by the Virgin and Muddy rivers. The Overton Arm of Lake Mead attracts the largest concentration of bald eagles wintering in the park.


Redstone
Picnic Area



Boulder Basin
Boulder Basin is the most recognizeable part of Lake Mead NRA. It is the closest part of the park to the entrances from Las Vegas, Henderson, and Boulder City.


Las Vegas Boat Harbor
(Off site link)
Callville Bay
(Off site Link)



East Lake Mead
Quiet and serene, east Lake Mead provides relaxation and scenery in the tranquil part of Lake Mead NRA.


Temple Bar
(Off site link)
South Cove


 

Plan your visit by starting on our Visitor Services Page. Here you will find useful links to everything from where to rent kayaks to boat repair and other services offered by permittees in the park.

Lake Mohave
Formed by Davis Dam, Lake Mohave is a recreation paradise with ample room for water skiing, boating, and swimming.


Cottonwood Cove
(Off site)
Grapevine Canyon
(Opens PDF Map)


 

Additional Related Pages
Camping Visitor Center Marinas

Did You Know?

Boating out of St Thomas

The pioneer town of St. Thomas, Nevada was flooded by the rising waters of Lake Mead in 1938. The 400 inhabitants had to find homes elsewhere. More...