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Thanking America's Armed Forces

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Date: May 18, 2012

LAKE MEAD NATIONAL RECREATION AREA News Release

For Immediate Release: May 16, 2012
Release No.: 2011-16
Contact: Sylvia Mc Martin, (702) 293-8807

 

Thanking America's Armed Forces

 

Active Duty U.S. Military Offered Free Entrance to All National Parks

BOULDER CITY, NV - To show our appreciation for those who serve in the U.S. Military, on May 19 - Armed Forces Day - the National Park Service will begin issuing an annual pass offering free entrance to all 397 national parks for active duty military members and their dependents.

"We all owe a debt to those who sacrifice so much to protect our country," said Lake Mead National Recreation Area Superintendent William K. Dickinson. "We are proud to recognize these brave men and women and hope that a visit to this or any national park will offer an opportunity to unwind, relax, rejuvenate, and just have fun with their families."

Active duty members of the U.S. Military and their dependents can pick up their pass at any park entrance station or park headquarters, 601 Nevada Way, Boulder City, NV 89005. They must show a current, valid military identification card to obtain their pass. More information is available at www.nps.gov/findapark/passes.htm.

This military version of the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass also permits free entrance to sites managed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S. Forest Service. The pass is also issued by these participating agencies.

"Through the years, military members, especially those far from home in times of conflict, have found inspiration in America's patriotic icons and majestic landscapes, places like the Statue of Liberty and the Grand Canyon that are cared for by the National Park Service and symbolize the nation that their sacrifices protect," said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. "This new pass is a way to thank military members and their families for their service and their sacrifices."

National parks and the military have strong ties going back to the establishment of Yellowstone as the world's first national park in 1872. The U.S. Cavalry watched over America's national parks and did double duty, serving as the first park rangers until the National Park Service was created 44 years later. During World War II, many parks were set aside for the training and care of military personnel. Today, dozens of national parks commemorate military battles and achievements.

www.nps.gov

 

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 397 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

Did You Know?

Geometric Petroglyphs on rocks

As early as 3,000 years ago, people inhabiting the Southwest began chiseling and painting pictures on rocks and cliff walls. Preserved by the dry climate, much of this rock art ranging from complicated geometric designs to huge figures, remains to puzzle, astonish, and awe modern-day viewers.