• Sunset at Lake Mead's Boulder Basin

    Lake Mead

    National Recreation Area AZ,NV

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • I-15 REOPENED, LAKE MEAD ENTRANCE FEES TO RESUME SUNDAY

    The Nevada Department of Transportation reopened a northbound and southbound lane of Interstate 15 Sept. 12; therefore, Lake Mead National Recreation Area entrance fees will resume Sept. 14. More »

  • Important Notice to Mariners

    Lake Mead water elevations will be declining throughout the summer. Before launching, check lake levels, launch ramp conditions, changes to Aids to Navigation and weather conditions by clicking on More »

  • Areas of Park Impacted by Storm Damage

    Strong storms rolled through Lake Mead National Recreation Area Aug. 3-4, causing damage to some areas of the park. Crews are working to restore the below locations. Debris may be present in other areas of the park, as well, especially in the backcountry. More »

Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Now Open To The Public

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: March 4, 2009
Contact: Cynthia Martinez, (702) 515-5450

Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Now Open To The Public



MOAPA, NV… The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today, the Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge will be open to the public every Saturday from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, beginning on March 7, 2009. Visitors will now be able to tour the new stream profile viewing chamber featuring a stream cross section, showcasing the endangered Moapa dace.

The new stream profile chamber provides an opportunity for visitors to see under the water’s surface and watch aquatic life in their natural environment. In addition to getting a close-up view of stream life, the Refuge staff plans to have additional activities on opening day:

9:00 AM -11:00 AM Bird Walk. Volunteer Bruce Lund, a Moapa resident and leader of the Muddy River Bird Count, will conduct a two-hour bird program searching for winter residents and early spring migrants. This program is offered to both the beginner and advanced birder, and will be an easy half-mile walk over hilly terrain. Decent walking shoes or boots, a hat and water are recommended. Binoculars will be provided.

12:00 PM- 4:00 PM Discovery Table. Examples of tracks and scat, along with some fun activities, will help visitors identify wildlife that occur at Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge.

The Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge is located about 60 miles northeast of Las Vegas on Warm Springs Road, off of Highway 168. It was established in 1979 to secure habitat for and protect the endangered Moapa dace. Over the past three years, extensive habitat restoration has taken place, including the construction of visitor facilities. The long process of habitat restoration began by restoring springs and re-stocking the stream channels with dace from other areas of the Muddy River headwaters.In addition to spring and channel restoration efforts, re-vegetation with native plants, removing non-native species, and enhancing stream flows have benefited the Moapa dace and the White River springfish, as well as other the endemic (native) species at the Wildlife Refuge.

For more information about the Refuge or planned events, please contact Amy Sprunger, Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge Manager by email at Amy_Sprunger@fws.gov or by phone at (702) 879-6110.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

Jeannie Stafford, Public Affairs

U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office

775-861-6336

 

Did You Know?

Poppies in the Nellis Wash Wilderness

"Dreams come true; without that possibility, nature would not incite us to have them." -- John Updike