• Sunset at Lake Mead's Boulder Basin

    Lake Mead

    National Recreation Area AZ,NV

NPS SEEKS PUBLIC COMMENT ON PROPOSED UPGRADE TO BOULDER BEACH CAMPGROUND

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: April 9, 2012

LAKE MEAD NATIONAL RECREATION AREA News Release

For Immediate Release: April 9, 2012
Release No.: 2012-12
Contact: Steve Daron (702) 293-8859

NPS SEEKS PUBLIC COMMENT ON PROPOSED UPGRADE TO BOULDER BEACH CAMPGROUND

LAS VEGAS, NV. - The National Park Service is seeking public comment on the proposed upgrades to the Boulder Beach Campground within Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The campground is located on Lakeshore Road six miles from Boulder City, Nevada.

The purpose of the project is to upgrade the approximately 65-year old Boulder Beach campground with enlarged campsites, exotic vegetation removal and enhanced accessibility.This project responds to a multi-agency cooperative effort to provide improved recreational opportunities for the residents and visitors of Southern Nevada.The demand for adequate camping facilities in the Las Vegas Valley continues to grow.This project will address those demands by providing camping facilities that are more attractive to modern RVs and other campers.

Boulder Beach Campground is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.Because this project will alter the original design of the campground including circulation patterns, campsite sizes, restrooms and landscaping, the National Historic Preservation Act requires the NPS to seek public input on these proposed changes.

Comments and recommendations concerning the project will be accepted through May 9, 2012. Comments may be submitted via email at: LAKE_Cultural_Resources @ nps.gov , or by U.S. Mail to Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Cultural Resources Office, 601 Nevada Way, Boulder City, NV 89005.

Documentation relating to this project may be found here

Did You Know?

Rattlesnake

Rattlesnakes bite about 1,000 people a year in the United States. Still, the risk of being killed by one is 20 times less than the risk of being struck by lightning.