• Autumn photo of Lake Clark and the Aleutian Range in Lake Clark National Park & Preserve

    Lake Clark

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Smokejumpers Deployed to Currant Creek Fire

CurrantCreekFire_20130714_CraigCoray
Smokejumpers parachute from an airplane to the Currant Creek Fire July 14, 2013
Craig Coray

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News Release Date: July 14, 2013
Contact: Mary McBurney, 907.602.2333

Port Alsworth, Alaska – Activity on the Currant Creek Fire increased yesterday prompting State of Alaska Division of Forestry fire managers to deploy eight smokejumpers to assess the fire from the ground.

The Currant Creek Fire, located 15 miles east of Port Alsworth, had been smoldering quietly until this weekend's warmer, drier weather rekindled activity along the fire's western flank. The smokejumpers are focused on keeping the fire from crossing Currant Creek and protecting native allotments located to the south of the creek mouth along Lake Clark. Division of Forestry fire managers are watching the fire closely and monitoring the local weather for winds that might blow embers across Currant Creek and cause the fire to spread.

Today's weather continues to be warm and dry, which may cause periodic spikes in fire activity throughout the day. A weather front moving in from the Bering Sea is predicted to bring rain and showers by Monday, which should help reduce fire activity and overall fire danger around Lake Clark. 

Pilots should be aware that there will be increased fire-related air traffic today in the Currant Creek area with Division of Forestry helicopters and aircraft conducting aerial surveillance and fire support missions. Area residents, park visitors and aviators should be prepared to deal with periods of smoke, diminished air quality and reduced visibility until the fire it is declared out.

For the latest information on wildfire smoke and air quality in your area, check the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Division of Air Quality website at http:// dec.alaska.gov/air/smokemain.htm.

For up-to-date Currant Creek Fire information, maps and photos visit: http://www.nps.gov/lacl/parkmgmt/currentfireinfo.htm.

Did You Know?

Mountainous Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is a tectonically active landscape.

Earthquakes are common in the tectonically active Lake Clark area. The Alaska Peninsula is located on the Pacific "Ring of Fire" and has one of the highest earthquake frequencies in the world.