• Autumn photo of Lake Clark and the Aleutian Range in Lake Clark National Park & Preserve

    Lake Clark

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

July 3 Wildfire Update

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: July 3, 2013
Contact: Morgan Warthin, 907.644.3418

Due to cool, wet weather, fire danger is low in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve and Southwest Alaska. However, until a multiple day wetting rain occurs over the Currant Creek Fire, expect occasional smoke from the fire. NPS and Division of Forestry wildfire managers will keep a close eye on the fire until it is declared out. Located 15 miles northeast of Port Alsworth, the 1,260-acre fire has received some rain but continues to move slowly up slope and toward the east. It is not expected to cross south of Currant Creek and does not pose an immediate threat to residents or property. The fire burns in a mosaic like pattern, leaving burned and unburned pockets of vegetation that will reduce the intensity and danger of future fires in the area.

The 19,080-acre Kristin Creek Fire, located 60 miles north of Port Alsworth and north of the Stony River has shown little activity for several days. Some isolated pockets of heat remain and scattered smoke will likely continue. Weather in the area continues to be rainy and foggy. Due to high fire activity in other portions of Alaska and the low fire risk to cabins at Bomhoff Lake, pumps at the site are being removed and prepared for use on other fires. The water handling equipment will remain so that firefighters can provide quick action to the structures, if needed. Fire protection equipment installed by helitack firefighters at structures associated with the airstrip remains in place. Firefighters will return to the area if conditions change and the fire threatens the structures. Fire managers will let the community know when the fire is declared out.

Find up-to-date Currant Creek and Kristin Creek Fire information, maps and photos 

Despite the damp weather throughout the area, NPS encourages everyone to be extra cautious with anything that could ignite a fire. July 4, 50 years ago, fireworks sparked a large wildfire in Port Alsworth. View a map of Lake Clark’s fire history and the 1953 fire perimeter. Unwanted human-caused fires pose a direct but preventable risk to public safety. They also are taxing on wildfire resources that are in high demand during this busy fire season. Enjoy your time outdoors and remember that fireworks are prohibited in the park. Everyone has a hand in a safe wildfire season.

There are currently more than 100 active wildfires in the state. Where there is fire, there is smoke. Park visitors, local residents and aviators should anticipate varying levels of smoke in the park. Find wildfire smoke information and visit the BLM's website for statewide information and a map of the active fires.

Did You Know?

Red salmon, also known as sockeyes, spawn in lakes and small streams.

Salmon migrate to the Lake Clark area from as far away as the western end of the Aleutian chain. During their homeward journey, they average 35 miles per day.