• Autumn photo of Lake Clark and the Aleutian Range in Lake Clark National Park & Preserve

    Lake Clark

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Smoke Seen at Currant Creek

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Date: July 12, 2013
Contact: Mary McBurney, (907) 602-2333

Smoke was reported yesterday afternoon on the Currant Creek Fire located fifteen miles east of Port Alsworth. The State of Alaska Division of Forestry sent the Division of Forestry Air Attack from Palmer to conduct an aerial reconnaissance of the fire and check on fire activity. They reported seeing two interior spots with some open flame and one small spot smoking on the fire’s western perimeter.

Area residents, park visitors and aviators are advised that smoke and flames may be visible today and through the weekend due to warmer and drier weather. According to fire managers, there is potential for growth along the western end of the fire, but threats to sensitive resources are minimal as long as the fire stays on the east side of Currant Creek. Division of Forestry Air Attack will keep an eye on the fire today and watch for any significant changes in fire activity.

Where there is fire, there is smoke. Fire and smoke are often part of Alaskan summers and people can anticipate varying levels of wildfire smoke due to current and expected fire activity. Generally, worse conditions occur overnight and during the early morning hours, as the atmosphere cools and brings smoke to the surface. During the day, surface heating will mix smoke and carry it upwards, temporarily improving air quality.

For the latest information on wildfire smoke and air quality in your area, check the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Division of Air Quality website at http:// dec.alaska.gov/air/smokemain.htm.

Did You Know?

Sharing smoked salmon is part of traditional Dena'ina life.

Dena'ina Athabascan people in the Lake Clark area preserve salmon by drying and smoking, as their ancestors have done for thousands of years.