• Autumn photo of Lake Clark and the Aleutian Range in Lake Clark National Park & Preserve

    Lake Clark

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Currant Creek Fire Update

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Date: July 26, 2013
Contact: Mary McBurney, 907-781-2218

Northern portions of the Currant Creek Fire has been active during this period of hot, dry weather and two NPS fire personnel were dispatched yesterday to install a weather station on Currant Creek and monitor the fire from the ground. Portable weather station NPSW is now operating at Currant Creek and weather data can be accessed online at http://fire.ak.blm.gov/wx/wxstart.php?disp=geog

As of this morning, the most active portion of the fire has burned to the shore of Lake Clark and is moving away from Currant Creek following the shoreline and available burnable vegetation. Another section of the fire is gradually burning toward Currant Creek and is expected to reach the northeast side of the creek later today. At this time, there is little chance of the fire crossing to the south side of Currant Creek and threatening private property. 

More accurate mapping of  fire perimeter by aerial surveillance showed it had increased to 1648.4 acres, more than double the 779 acres reported on July 3 from the last detailed mapping effort. The fire perimeter had not been accurately updated since July 3.  While some of the increased acreage is due to recent fire activity, additional growth can be attributed to creeping and smoldering fire behavior over the past few weeks.

The weather trend for the next several days is predicted to be warm and dry with a low chance of precipitation. Occasional heavy smoke will persist in the area indefinitely, so area residents, park visitors and aviators should be prepared to deal with periods of diminished air quality and reduced visibility. 

Visit http://www.nps.gov/lacl/parkmgmt/currentfireinfo.htm for up-to-date fire information and call 907.781.2218 if you have questions or concerns

 

Did You Know?

Red salmon, also known as sockeyes, spawn in lakes and small streams.

Salmon migrate to the Lake Clark area from as far away as the western end of the Aleutian chain. During their homeward journey, they average 35 miles per day.