• Autumn photo of Lake Clark and the Aleutian Range in Lake Clark National Park & Preserve

    Lake Clark

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

"Where We Found A Whale" A History of Lake Clark National Park & Preserve

"What has survived above all is a sense of identity. The Alutiiq and Dena'ina suffered from forced acculturation under U.S. government policy, but many aspects of traditional culture survived, thanks to the stories passed from one generation to the next. They preserved tales of ancient heroes and mythic beings, ukgwepet--"our beliefs"--ties to the land, shared history and strong ties to the past...language, kinship, and subsistence."

 
Book cover for Where We Found A Whale: featuring a painting of an Aleutian hunter paddling his kayak past a  seal rookery.

By Brian Fagan
Archeologist, National Park Service

You can view specific sections of this book as listed below, download the entire book, or emaill us to request a paperback copy.


Table of Contents & Preface

Setting the Stage: A Glacial Landscape, A Land of Two Worlds: The Interior, A Land of Two Worlds: The Coast, The Native People, The Archaeologists, The Tools at Hand

The First Settlers: First Settlement: By Land or Water?, When Was First Settlement?, Routes Southward, Paleoarctic Peoples: First Settlement in Southern Alaska

 
A red pictograph of a figures paddling and a figure standing at the stern. A figure depicting a whale appears at the bottom right.

An angyaq, with four paddlers and a figure standing at what appears to be the stern. A whale appears at the bottom right. The image is digitally enhanced.

NPS/J. Henderson

Exploiting the Shore: Early Maritime Settlement, Sea-Lion Hunters on Mink Island, Ocean Bay, The Kachemak Tradition, Lake Clark: The Remote Shore

The Alutiiqs: The "Real People", Reduced Mobility, A Culture of Specialists, The Whalers, Sea-Mammal Hunting, A Palimpsest of Ritual, People of Power

Tuxedni Rock Shelter: Archaeologists at Tuxedni, The Paintings, What Do the Paintings Mean?

Clam Cove: A Quest for Chronology, The South Wall Paintings, The West Wall Paintings, Who Painted Here?

 
A red ochre pictograph of a human figure, with legs joined by a thin line, holds what appears to be two rattles.

A human figure, with somewhat relaxed legs joined by a thin line, holds what appears to be two rattles. The image is digitally enhanced.

NPS/J. Henderson

Ancient Painters: Tuxedni and Clame Cove, Comparisons, Artists as Shamans

The Dena'ina: The Frontier Shifts, "The People", Fish, Game, and Plants, Winter and Summer, Chiefs and Shamans, Mapping and Land

Contact: Captain James Cook, Russian Fur Traders and the Alutiiqs, Meanwhile, in Cook Inlet..., Excavations at Kijik, "Our Beliefs"

Appendix: Conserving Lake Clark Park's Rock Paintings & Learning More

Did You Know?

Boats from the Snug Harbor fishing fleet at the cannery dock.

The Snug Harbor Cannery off the coast of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve operated from 1919 to 1980. In its early years the cannery used fish traps, which were banned after Alaska gained statehood.