• Image of sand dunes

    Kobuk Valley

    National Park Alaska

Get Connected

June 28, 2012 Posted by: Marci Johnson

"A visit inspires love of country; begets contentment; engenders pride of possession; contains the antidote for national restlessness.... He is a better citizen with a keener appreciation of the privilege of living here who has toured the national parks." 
     - Newton B. Drury, Director of the National Park Service 1940-1951  

If you are ready to explore the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes or the Serpentine Hot Springs, park the Airstream and unpack the car.  The Western Arctic National Parklands can't be reached by road.  Even for those who live in the surrounding communities, reaching the parks can be expensive and challenging.  Until you board the float plane, hop in the boat, drive the snowmachine, paddle, hike, mush, or ski to reach them, you can connect with and learn more about the parks on the official NPS websites, Twitter, and Facebook.  

BERING LAND BRIDGE NATIONAL PRESERVE               
Website:              www.nps.gov/bela               
Twitter:                www.twitter.com/BeringLandNPS               
Facebook:           www.facebook.com/BeringLandNPS  

CAPE KRUSENSTERN NATIONAL MONUMENT               
Website:              www.nps.gov/cakr               
Twitter:                www.twitter.com/CKrusensternNPS               

KOBUK VALLEY NATIONAL PARK               
Website:              www.nps.gov/kova               
Twitter:                www.twitter.com/KobukValleyNPS  

NOATAK NATIONAL PRESERVE               
Website:             www.nps.gov/noat               
Twitter:               www.twitter.com/NoatakNPS  

If you're on Facebook and need a new cover photo for your timeline, download this image from Noatak National Preserve and start imagining yourself here:
FBcover_NOATyouarehere


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Did You Know?

Image of shrubs and berry plants on the tundra near blue lakes turn red and gold in the fall.

Even though Kobuk Valley National Park gets only 50 cm of rain and snow each year, much of the lowland tundra is soggy. Permafrost, many feet below the surface of the soil, prevents the water from draining away.