• Aerial photograph of Big Hidatsa National Historic Landmark, located within Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site.

    Knife River Indian Villages

    National Historic Site North Dakota

History-The Hidatsa at Knife River Indian Villages NHS

Knife River Indian Villages NHS News Release

Release Date: July29, 2013

Contact: Dorothy Cook, 701-745-3300, dorothy_cook@nps.gov

History-The Hidatsa at Knife River Indian Villages NHS

Stanton, ND: Visitors to Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site on Saturday, August 3, 2013, are in for a special treat. Giving special presentations on the Hidatsa Culture will be Gerard Baker and Angel Palmersheim.

Gerard Baker returns to the park to present The Villages-A Recollection at 2:00p.m. CDT. This program will include his personal recollections of the park. Gerard is a member of the Three Affiliated Tribes. He worked for the National Park Service for 35 years and began his career at Knife River Indian Villages. Over his long career, Gerard worked at numerous other parks including Theodore Roosevelt National Park, the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, and Mount Rushmore National Monument.

Following Gerard's talk will be Angel Palmersheim. Angel will present Hidatsa Historical Clothing at 3:00 p.m. CDT. The program will focus on the traditional clothing worn by the Hidatsa. Angel, also a member of the Three Affiliated Tribes, attended the College for Fashion Design and Management. With a passion for sewing, Angel's interests are making Native American dolls, men and women's clothing, and children's regalia.

"Gerard's intimate knowledge of Knife River Indian Villages NHS and Angel's background in design and fashion should make for fascinating presentations" says Acting Superintendent Craig Hansen.

Visit Knife River Indian Villages on Saturday, August 3rd to hear two informative presentations and learn more about the Hidatsa Culture.

For more information, please contact the parkat 701-745-3300.

www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 401 national parks and workwith communities across the nation to help preserve local history and createclose-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

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