• Aerial photograph of Big Hidatsa National Historic Landmark, located within Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site.

    Knife River Indian Villages

    National Historic Site North Dakota

Hands on History to be Presented at Knife River Indian Villages

Stanton,ND: Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site will host an event on Saturday, August 17, 2013 where visitors can experience weapons from the past. "Hands on History," a series of events that encourage visitor participation, will take place from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. CDT at the visitor center.

Robert Hanna will present "The Guns of Lewis and Clark" at 1:00 p.m. He will talk about the guns that the expedition carried with them on the journey. All the weapons were either flint lock rifles or muskets. Robert will have examples of the Harper's Ferry rifle, the 1795 musket, and the blunderbuss. The black powder weapons will not be fired in accordance with federal regulations, however these weapons will be on display.

From 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. the public can try their hand at tossing the atlatl. The atlatl was a throwing tool used by early Native Americans for hunting. Today, the atlatl is used in competition and there is a growing movement to restore itas a legal hunting tool in the United States. Some parts of the country have formal meetings and events for atlatl competition. Visitors will have an opportunity to learn how to use hand crafted atlatls. If the participants are good sports, a competition may ensue!

Saturday, August 17, the public is invited to learn the history of weaponry used byPlains Indians and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. For more information, please contact the park at 701-745-3300.

www.nps.gov

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Did You Know?

Bison in the snow.

Almost every part of the bison had a practical application in everyday Hidatsa life, including the “buffalo chips” which could be used for fuel or baby powder.