Lesson Plan

Arts, Crafts, Clothing and Appearance:  Flint, Pottery, Painting

Pencil sketch of flint knapping, pottery, bone paint brush

Pencil sketch of flint knapping, pottery, bone paint brush

NPS Sketch

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Grade Level:
Fourth Grade-Eighth Grade
Subject:
History, Language Arts, Reading, Writing
Duration:
45-60 minutes
Group Size:
Up to 24
Setting:
classroom
National/State Standards:

ND State Standards:  Social Studies: Fourth Grade 4.2.2, 4.2.3, 4.2.4, 4.2.5, 4.2.6, 4.2.7, 4.2.8, 4.2.9, 4.2.10, 4.2.11, 4.3.2, 4.5.1, 4.5.3, 4.5.4, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.5.6 Eighth Grade 8.1.1 ,8.1.2

Overview

Hidatsas and Mandans made tools, housewares, clothing, toys, and musical instruments from things that were available nearby or sometimes farther off if the material was important in the production of the item.  In this lesson, students will tell a story by designing a buffalo robe like people did during Knife River Village days and they will discuss and portray how people might describe the life-ways of today one hundred years from the present using their media of choice.

Objective(s)

Students will:
Identify three arts and crafts from Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara tribes.
Discuss the importance of flint in the geography and economy of the Hidatsa during the Knife River village days, what flint was used for and identify what has replaced flint today.
Describe other locations throughout the United States where Knife River flint has been found.

Background

The Arts, Crafts, Clothing and Appearance Unit is divided into four units and incorporates reading, discussion and hands on activities for students to explore Hidatsa culture.  

Lesson 1 focusses on flint potteryand painting. Students will read and discuss flint and pottery and practice telling stories using symbols through a hide painting activity.

Materials

Student background information
Native American Symbols

Procedure

Assessment

Students presentations will reflect thoughtfulness and attention to details.
Student buffalo hides designs will demonstrate understanding of the concept of telling stories with pictures.

Park Connections

Like other American Indian groups the Hidatsas and Mandans made tools, housewares,clothing, toys, and musical instruments from things that were available nearby, or sometimes farther off if the material was important in the production of the item. Preserving the arts and crafts ofthe Hidatsa and Mandans provides a tangible means of connecting the past, present and future of the people for generations to come.

Extensions

On-site
Take a close look at the buffalo robes at Knife River. What kind of designs to the robes have? What types of materials were used to make the designs?

Post-Visit

Design a buffalo robe that tells a story using only symbols. Be prepared to explain your design.

 

Go Digital

You may use a digital drawing program if you have and iPad such as colored pencil or chalk to design your buffalo robe.

Additional Resources

Search the Internet for Native American Symbols for students to use as they tell their stories through hide painting.

Vocabulary

Knife River flint, stone tools, arrowheads, blanks, pottery, pigments, buffalo robes, rawhide, capillary action.