• Artist rendering of Pioneer Square during Klondike Gold Rush

    Klondike Gold Rush - Seattle Unit

    National Historical Park Washington

HARD DRIVE TO THE KLONDIKE: PROMOTING SEATTLE DURING THE GOLD RUSH: Footnotes for Introduction


 

1 "American Survey: The Heirs of the Klondike," The Economist (February 15-21, 1997), p. 25.

2 The Trade Register, December Trade Summary, 1898, p. 28; Pierre Berton, The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Gold Rush (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1958). Neither source explains how the precise number of gold seekers was obtained.

3 William B. Haskell, Two Years in the Klondike and Alaska Gold-Fields, 1896-1898 (Fairbanks: University of Alaska Press, 1998), p. 17.

4 "American Survey: The Heirs of the Klondike," p. 25.

5 Kimberly B. Marlowe, "Seattitude," Pacific Northwest, The Seattle Times, August 16, 1998, p. 8.

6 Bill Gates, "The Internet 'Gold Rush': Where's the Gold?," Microsoft Internet Column, http://www.microsoft.com./BillGates_L/column/1995essay/12-6-95.htm, p. 1.

7 James Wallace and Jim Erickson, Hard Drive: Bill Gates and the Making of the Microsoft Empire (New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1992), p. 125.

8 "American Survey: The Heirs of the Klondike," p. 25.

9 Murray Morgan, Skid Road: An Informal Portrait of Seattle (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1982), p. 10.

10 Irving Sayford, "The Klondike Put Seattle on the Map," Travel, March 1939.


 
 

Did You Know?

Did You Know? 1 in every 10 Klondike Stampeders was a woman

Of the over 70,000 stampeders headed for the gold fields during the Klondike Gold Rush, 1 in every 10 was a woman.