• Stampeders Hiking the Golden Stair case with heavy packs

    Klondike Gold Rush

    National Historical Park Alaska

2014 Chilkoot Artist in Residence

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Date: December 4, 2013
Contact: Cindy Von Halle, 907-983-9206

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park is now recruiting artist submissions for the 2014 Chilkoot Trail Artist in Residency program. Three visual artists – one from Canada, one from the United States and one regional (Yukon or Alaskan residents) will be selected to participate in a crossborder creative journey within Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park, Alaska and Chilkoot Trail National Historic Site, British Columbia. The program information is posted at the Yukon Arts Center website and applications accepted until February 1, 2014. Yukon Arts Centre, Parks Canada and the National Park Service have partnered with the Alaska Geographic Association and the Skagway Arts Council to provide this unique program. Artists will spend two weeks on the Chilkoot Trail working with visitors and creating memorable art inspired by the natural beauty and historical features of the Park.Presentations will be held in Skagway, AK and in Whitehorse, YT as well as at campsites along the Chilkoot Trail to help visitors appreciate the legacy of the Chilkoot Trail, once trod by Tlingit First Nation traders and Klondike stampeders.For more information or to apply, please visit www.yukonartscentre.com, or contact Cynthia Von Halle at the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Skagway, 907-983-9206.

About the National Park Service- More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

 

Did You Know?

pile of boards and canvas in ruin on rocks

The mystery of why these canvas boats were left behind at the Chilkoot summit of Klondike Gold Rush NHP, remains unsolved. One theory reports that it was too costly to pay the customs to take them over the border. Perhaps they were too flimsy for the rough waters of Bennett Lake?