• Nine men pose with gear at the Alaska-British Columbia border in the snow

    Klondike Gold Rush

    National Historical Park Alaska

Law Enforcement Rangers Host Interagency Training with Skagway Police Department

November 26, 2012 Posted by: Liz Blakeley

Hi, my name is Liz Blakeley and I am one of the law enforcement rangers here at Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. I am also one of the newest bloggers for our website. I'm hoping to fill you in on what a law enforcement ranger in Alaska does. The quick answer to that is, a lot! 

While we wear the same uniform as Interpretive and General Rangers, we have some additional duties. We provide law enforcement, emergency medical, fire and search and rescue services to the park and the surrounding community. We also frequently participate in community outreach by assisting with school programs, seasonal employee orientations, bear awareness training, and much more. On top of that, we do whatever is needed. (Yesterday, I was lying in slush and ice changing a tire, just another day in the life of a law enforcement ranger!)

With all of these different hats we wear, it takes a lot of training to make sure we are knowledgeable and safe as possible while carrying out our duties. We participate in yearly week-long emergency medical technician refreshers, a four-day long rough terrain rescue refresher with our Canadian counterparts, as well as, a week-long law enforcement refresher. We also participate in many shorter trainings, but I won't bore you with the details.

The main purpose of my blog post today is to tell you about an exciting training opportunity that we were able to participate in with our local police department. The Skagway Police Department provides law enforcement services to the town of Skagway all the way up to the Canadian border. They are an integral part of our community. Because we are both small law enforcement operations, it is often times challenging to get enough officers and rangers together to do larger-scale trainings separately, so this October we joined forces for two days and participated in a Control Tactics and Firearms Refresher workshop. Law Enforcement personnel shooting guns
Klondike Gold Rush Rangers and Skagway Police Officers train together.


It was really great to get both agencies together and gain a better understanding of how we both operate. Simple things like how an officer approaches a scene can vary from agency to agency, not to mention officer to officer. Getting to know the officers you work with is invaluable and we're fortunate that we got this time to get to know each other better. With the success of this training, we're hoping to continue building these relationships and improve the public services that we provide to the community and lands that we jointly protect.

Law Enforcement Personnel shooting shotguns
Instructor Chief Ranger Steidel look on while trainees shoot at the range.

 


3 Comments Comments Icon

  1. Brayton - Skagway, Alaska
    November 27, 2012 at 10:35

    Well done Liz! Hey, who's that guy in black? ;.)

  2. Boyd - Skagway, Alaska
    November 26, 2012 at 11:04

    Off to a great start, Liz. Nice clear photos and a clear explanation of what's going on. You might want to work with the Customs (CBP) folks at the Skagway port-of-entry about some off season training on fraudulent document training because you do occasionally get Chilkoot Trail hikers from target countries walking south and your NPS rangers see them first. Years ago a Russian walked from Bennett to Dyea and turned himself in. He turned out to be wanted in Montreal and was sent to a detention center in Seattle before deportation back to the USSR. Tim might remember that. Officer Todd Brown is exceptional in his knowledge abdout fraudulent passports and other documents.

  3. Laurie-Ann
    November 26, 2012 at 08:17

    nice job Liz

 

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Did You Know?

Painting of men standing in the snow carrying gear

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