• Centennial Monument

    Kings Mountain

    National Military Park South Carolina

Legislative Foundation for Kings Mountain National Military Park

Authorization for a Commemorative Monument on the Kings Mountain Battleground

The erection of a monument on the Kings Mountain Battleground was authorized by an Act of Congress (34 Stat. 286) on June 16, 1906. Congress appropriated $30,000 for the purpose and directed that the plans and specifications for the monument be approved by the Secretary of War, that the Kings Mountain Centennial Association of South Carolina secure title to not more than 50 acres of the battleground prior to the expenditure of any part of the appropriation, and that the care and upkeep of the monument remain with the Kings Mountain Battle Ground Association of South Carolina.



Creation of Study Commission to Inspect Kings Mountain Battlefield

By an act of Congress (45 Stat. 412), approved April 9, 1928, a commission was created to inspect the Kings Mountain Battlefield for the purpose of determining the feasibility of preserving the battlefield and marking it for historical and professional military study. The legislation directed the commission to submit a report of its findings and a list of its itemized expenses to the Secretary of War by December 1, 1928.



Establishment of the Park

Kings Mountain National Military Park in South Carolina was established by an Act of Congress, (46 Stat. 1508), on March 3, 1931.



Transfer of the Park to the Secretary of the Interior's Authority

Executive Order No. 6166, dated June 10, 1933 transferred the authority conferred on the Secretary of War by the act of March 3, 1931 to the Secretary of the Interior.



Secretarial Order Determining the Boundaries of Kings Mountain National Military Park

On July 11, 1940 Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes issued an order designating 4,012 acres of land in Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina to be within the boundaries of Kings Mountain National Military Park. This order was issued under the authority of the act establishing the park and the Executive order that transferred the authority from the Secretary of War to the Secretary of the Interior.

Did You Know?

plaque at Hoover monument

President Herbert Hoover's visit to the Kings Mountain Battlefield in 1930 was the first time an American president had visited a Southern Revolutionary War Site. An estimated 75,000-80,000 people attended the 150th anniversary in 1930