• Underground Tamarack Trammer Car

    Keweenaw

    National Historical Park Michigan

New Park Sign Unveiled

Area residents, park partners and staff gather to celebrate the completion of the new park sign.
Area residents, park partners and staff gather to celebrate the completion of the new park sign.
NPS Photo, Dan Johnson

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News Release Date: June 15, 2009
Contact: Tom Baker, Management Assistant, (906) 337-1104, ext 131

(Calumet, MI) The National Park Service at Keweenaw National Historical Park unveiled the first park entrance sign Monday morning with park movement organizers, Keweenaw Heritage Sites representatives, community supporters, and local dignitaries on hand to participate in the occasion. All in attendance, including the park's first superintendent Bill Fink and present superintendent Jim Corless, joined forces to roll up the construction fence, symbolizing the beginning of the transformational period when this unique partnership park starts to offer visitors and the Copper Country community a more traditional national park experience.

Superintendent Corless emphasized that the various elements that comprise Keweenaw NHP, including community organizations, private businesses, homeowners, local governments, the Keweenaw Heritage Sites, the Keweenaw NHP Advisory Commission, and the National Park Service are working together to provide a cohesive national park experience, and that all are part of this unique national park.

Corless noted, "This park has been a grass roots movement from its conception, and continues to depend on local energy for its success."

Corless recognized the efforts of Landscape Architect Steve DeLong and Stonemason Steve D’Agostino respectively for the design and crafting of the sign structure, which mirrors the construction methods of the C&H craftsmen that built the adjacent structures. He also recognized the great support that Keweenaw NHP has received from its congressional delegation, and the support of State Representative Mike Lahti, who was in attendance.

Each of the twenty or so park principles in attendance assisted in removing the construction fence to 'unveil' the new entrance sign, indicative of the active partnership involvement in Keweenaw National Historical Park.

Did You Know?

This exposed vein of copper bearing rock leading into Lake Superior at Fort Wilkins State Park provided evidence of the area's copper wealth

Early native peoples began the first metal mining in North America over 7,000 years ago with copper mining on Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. Copper was fashioned into tools and items that were traded throughout North America.