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    Keweenaw

    National Historical Park Michigan

Fourth Thursday in History: Honoring Eagle Harbor Lifesavers

Photo of Life-saving service in Eagle Harbor, Michigan.
Members of the U.S. Life-Saving Service in Eagle Harbor, Michigan
Anthony Glaza Photo, 1913

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News Release Date: January 26, 2010
Contact: Kathleen Harter, (906) 337-3168

Lake Superior is formidable, dangerous, and often deadly. No one knew that more than the courageous U.S. Lifesavers at Eagle Harbor that lived by the motto "you have to go out, but you do not have to come back." These lifesavers are being honored in a new Keweenaw County Historical Society museum. Join Mark Rowe, Keweenaw County Historical Society Trustee, as he shares the history of these brave men and describes the process of building a museum to highlight their history.

Rowe has been intimately involved with the Society's effort to establish the museum from the very beginning. He will first speak about the history of Station Eagle Harbor and its crew of U.S. Lifesavers, a special federal service which became part of the U.S. Coast Guard in 1915. He will highlight the efforts to preserve the U.S. Coast Guard boathouse building, and describe how the Society acquired the boats and other apparatus needed to build the museum exhibits. Come and hear how this museum and exhibit will showcase this important aspect of the Keweenaw's history.

This event will begin at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 28, 2010 at the Houghton Township Hall in Eagle River, Michigan. Additional support for this evening’s program is being provided by Houghton Township and the Keweenaw County Historical Society.

This evening is part of the Fourth Thursday in History speaker series sponsored by Keweenaw National Historical Park. The Fourth Thursday in History series arranges public presentations on important aspects of Copper Country and regional history, including techniques for historic preservation. Presentations are scheduled in venues throughout the Keweenaw Peninsula, particularly at historic sites associated with specific topics. They are free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Keweenaw National Historical Park at (906) 337-3168.

Did You Know?

A small memorial park in Calumet, Michigan where the Italian Hall once stood is for the 74 people killed in a stampede on Dec. 24, 1913.

Woody Guthrie's song "1913 Massacre" brought attention to a tragedy that occurred in Calumet, Michigan on December 24, 1913 during a bitter copper miner's strike. Reports claim that a shout of fire caused panic at a party at the Italian Hall. 73 people died in the stampede down the steep stairway.