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    Keweenaw

    National Historical Park Michigan

Fourth Thursday in History: Legends of the Fall, A History of Keweenaw Forests

Natural processes, changing environments, and human activities have all shaped the Keweenaw Peninsula’s forests.
Natural processes, changing environments, and human activities have all shaped the Keweenaw Peninsula’s forests.
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News Release Date: September 24, 2007
Contact: Kathleen Harter, (906) 337-1104

Natural processes, changing environments, and human activities have all shaped the Upper Peninsula’s forests. Join Michigan Technological University's Linda Nagel as she describes the history of these woodlands, and explains how forests reveal changing perspectives about conservation and renewable resources.

Nagel is an associate professor in the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science. Her talk will explain the important role forests have always played in the lives of the Keweenaw's inhabitants and the industries they pursue, from the earliest Native American residents to European settlers and the copper mining industry. Logging – past and present – has also left its mark on the Keweenaw’s woodlands, as have efforts to reforest the landscape.

Nagel's talk will take place on Thursday, September 27, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. It will be held in Room G002 in the Noblet Forestry Building, located on 7th Street near MacInnes Drive and U.S. Highway 41 on the MTU campus.

The Fourth Thursday in History series arranges public presentations on important aspects of Copper Country and regional history, including techniques for historic preservation. Presentations are scheduled in venues throughout the Keweenaw Peninsula, particularly at historic sites associated with specific topics. They are free and open to the public. Additional support for this event is being provided by Michigan Technological University’s School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science.

For further information, including specific directions to this event, contact Keweenaw National Historical Park at (906) 337-3168.

 
Future Fourth Thursday in History Events

A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum – Past, Present and Future
October 25, 2007
Electrical Energy Resource Center, Room 100, Michigan Technological University campus

For more detailed information on upcoming events, contact Keweenaw National Historical Park at (906) 337-3168.

Did You Know?

This exposed vein of copper bearing rock leading into Lake Superior at Fort Wilkins State Park provided evidence of the area's copper wealth

Early native peoples began the first metal mining in North America over 7,000 years ago with copper mining on Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. Copper was fashioned into tools and items that were traded throughout North America.