• Underground Tamarack Trammer Car

    Keweenaw

    National Historical Park Michigan

Fourth Thursday in History: Calumet's Catholic Churches

Historic postcard of St Joseph's Catholic Church.
Keweenaw NHP Archives

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News Release Date: January 25, 2007
Contact: Abby Sue Fisher, (906) 337-3168

Calumet’s numerous historic churches reflect the community’s size, prosperity, and its ethnic and religious diversity during the boom years of the copper mining era. Houses of worship provided immigrants, whether they were Catholic, Jewish, or Protestant, with a sense of community and a bridge between the Old World and the New. Catholic immigrants, including Croatians, Italians, and Slovenians, built six different Catholic churches alone. Each parish was identified with a specific ethnicity, like St. Anne’s French-Canadian congregation or Croatians at St. John the Baptist. These churches allow a look into Calumet’s past.

Using historic photos, National Park Service archivist Jeremiah Mason will present an illustrated talk on Calumet’s Catholic churches at St. Paul the Apostle Church in Calumet on January 25. Beginning at 7:00 p.m., the talk, part of the Fourth Thursday in History series, will highlight the churches’ role in Calumet’s social, architectural, and religious history. St. Paul the Apostle Church is located at 301 8th Street in Calumet, Michigan.

The Fourth Thursday in History presentation series focuses on various aspects of Copper Country and regional history, including current research and techniques for historic preservation. Presentations are given in venues throughout the Keweenaw Peninsula. They are free and open to the public. Additional support for this event is being provided by St. Paul the Apostle Church.

For further information, including specific directions to this event, contact Keweenaw National Historical Park at (906) 337-3168.

Announcement of Upcoming Fourth Thursday in History Events

Mail, Trails and Sled Dog Tales
February 22, 2007
Finnish American Heritage Center,
601 Quincy Street, Hancock

Lake Linden’s National Register Nomination
March 22, 2007
Lake Linden-Hubbell High School Auditorium,
601 Calumet Street, Lake Linden

Fifth Annual High School Local History Smackdown!
April 26, 2007
Calumet Theatre, Calumet

Did You Know?

The Nordberg Steam Hoist, the largest steam hoist in the world, once lowered miners 9,260 feet down into the shafts of the Quincy Mine.

To reach 9,260 feet down into the shafts of the Quincy copper mine, the world's largest steam-driven hoist was built in 1918. The Nordberg Steam Hoist and its reinforced concrete building, with brick veneer and Italian-tiled walls, cost over $370,000 but was used for only eleven years.