• Underground Tamarack Trammer Car

    Keweenaw

    National Historical Park Michigan

2009 Keweenaw Heritage Grants Available

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Date: June 11, 2009
Contact: Tom Baker, (906) 337-1104 ext. 131

(Calumet, MI) The National Park Service at Keweenaw National Historical Park is offering its Keweenaw Heritage Grants program once again this year. The grants are available to owners of historic property within the Quincy and Calumet units of the park.

The purpose of the 2009 Keweenaw Heritage Grants is to provide enhancement funds for a broad range of projects and programs including, but not limited to, historic facade rehabilitation, cyclic historic maintenance, historic landscape preservation, preservation planning and design, museum collections preservation and care, development of interpretive exhibits and programs, interpretive publications, sustainable interpretation and preservation pilot programs, and other preservation and heritage-related projects. Greater consideration will be given to proposals that address accessibility, safety, and sustainability.

Projects are to be completed September 30, 2010. Grants will range between $1,000 and $50,000 (a total of $30,000 to $50,000 is expected to be available in 2009). Grant funds are typically available to successful grantees by October 1. The park's recently amended legislation reduces the cash match to $1 for every $1 of National Park Service funds.

Applications are available at park headquarters, located at 25970 Red Jacket Road in Calumet, by calling park headquarters at 906-337-3168, or by download from the park's grants webpage. The short-response applications and required documentation are to be delivered to park headquarters by the close of business on Monday, June 29, 2009. Projects will be selected for funding based on answers submitted in the application, available funds, and a balance of project types and location.

For additional information, please call park headquarters at 906-337-3168 or contact us by email.

Did You Know?

A piece of float copper sets on exhibit near the Calumet & Hecla general offices.

The largest known quantities in the world of pure, native copper were found on Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. In some cases, the deposits were up to 97% pure, requiring little chemical processing to produce ingots of pure copper.