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    Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens

    District of Columbia

Amphibians

A cautious frog peeks out of the water

A frog can't be too careful these days.

Mark Routt

Amphibians and reptiles can be monitored as indicators of environmental changes, most particularly in the water. An assortment of contaminants, fungi, parasites, and diseases are impacting their breeding and development. From 1999 to 2009 the park collected data on frogs by listening to their calls.

The park is home to at least five kinds of frogs, two species of toads, and several kinds of salamanders. Visitors can expect to hear the steady peep and confrontational trill of spring peepers beginning in February through early March, and again in the fall. If it is quiet visitors may hear the snoring sound made by the pickerel frog or the soft quacking noise of the southern leopard frog. There is a lull in breeding in April then the glunk of green frogs and moan of bull frogs continues until August.

Did You Know?

water beading on a lotus leaf

The top of the lotus leaf is covered with wax pebbles, making it better at shedding water than a plain wax surface. This surface is being copied for rain ware. More...