• Large male brown bear at Brooks Falls

    Katmai

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Traveling Green

Worldwide, climates are warming. Much of Alaska and Katmai is experiencing this change first hand with warmer year-round temperatures, receding glaciers, and other impacts.

When you decide to "travel green,” you choose to help combat climate change and other challenging environmental issues. Individual actions matter and one individual can make a difference. Even small efforts can add up to big changes when people work together.

While planning your trip to Katmai National Park and Preserve, consider using some of the following tips to reduce your carbon footprint, travel costs, and trash.
  • Plan your route to minimize carbon emissions. Travel by train and public transport where possible. You’ll likely be flying to Katmai, so minimize the number and length of your flights. In 2011, greenhouse gas emissions from transportation accounted for about 28% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
  • If you are selecting a tour or guiding service, support green business practices. Ask businesses how they minimize environmental impacts and contribute to the local economy.
  • To save money while you are gone, adjust your air conditioner and/or heat to the lowest practicable setting. Turn your hot water heater to "vacation" or the lowest setting, or just turn off the breaker. Unplug appliances, such as televisions and computers. They can draw or "leak" as much as 40 watts per hour even when they are turned off. This can add up to significant cost savings. In 2011, electrical generation contributed about 33% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Minimize the trash you produce in Katmai. Handling and disposing of garbage is very time consuming and costly in remote parts of Alaska. Trash in Katmai must be flown out to a landfill or incinerated. No recycling facilities exist. Therefore, repackage the food you intend to bring with you. This will go a long way towards minimizing trash and its associated costs.
Visit the Climate Friendly Parks Program webpage for more information.


Did You Know?

Fording Windy Creek in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes

The only bridge in Katmai spans the Brooks River. All other rivers in the park must be crossed on foot or by boat. Be careful as heavy rains or melting snow can quickly cause the rivers to become uncrossable.