• Large male brown bear at Brooks Falls

    Katmai

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Backcountry Hiking and Camping

Hikers descend the pumice coverd slopes of Broken Mountain
Katmai National Park and Preserve offers countless opportunities for wilderness travel.
 
With less than five miles of maintained trails, Katmai is a wilderness park. Its backcountry is filled with nearly limitless possibilities for adventure, challenge, exploration and solitude. Wilderness travel can be by foot, kayak, canoe, raft, boat or airplane.

Most backcountry users find that they need skills beyond basic camping skills to have a safe and memorable experience. No permits are necessary to camp in Katmai's backcountry, but careful planning is necessary in order to have a safe and enjoyable visit. Explore the links below to begin planning your backcountry adventure.

Backcountry Regulations and Suggested Best Practices
Carry the Ten Essentials

Destinations
Leave No Trace in Katmai
Voluntary Backcountry Trip Planner

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Migratory birds begin returning from their wintering grounds in March. Along the Naknek River, thousands and thousands of waterfowl, like tundra swans, gather on pockets of open water as they wait for the region's wetlands to thaw.