• Large male brown bear at Brooks Falls

    Katmai

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Amalik Bay

Archeologists use a laser transit to get extremely accurate measurements of artifacts and house features.
NPS archeologists mapping an eroding site in
Amalik Bay NHL.
 

Amalik Bay, on the Katmai coast, is both a National Historic Landmark and a Archeological District listed on the National Register of Historic Place. It's one of only five places in the state of Alaska to have both designations.

This beautiful, remote coastline has nurtured human communities for thousands of years. People who lived here hunted sea mammals, fished, and harvested the bounty of the intertidal zone. The oldest sites are more than 7,000 years old. Imagine, people were settled in this distant corner of the world more than two thousand years before the first boulders were rolled into place at Stonehenge and three thousand years before Egyptians built the largest of the Giza pyramids.

If you go...
The Amalik Bay sites are fragile and threatened by erosion and other natural forces. You can help be a good steward of these precious and irreplaceable remains! If you find a site, please enjoy your discovery. Help keep it intact by staying well away from eroding areas. Resist the temptation to take artifacts - your souvenirs should be memories and pictures. Your stewardship today will ensure that these sites are available for future generations.

Did You Know?

A microblade core from the Preserve.

The first people in Katmai arrived about 9,000 years ago. They left behind artifacts like this one, a core from which small microblades were struck. Expert tool makers set the microblades into the sides of bone arrowheads to increase cutting power.