• Kaloko fishpond wall is over 800 ft long and spans a natural cove

    Kaloko-Honokōhau

    National Historical Park Hawai'i

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  • Mauka-Makai Trail From Visitor Center to 'Ai'opio Fishtrap Closed Aug 11-22nd

    Due to the unforeseen weather conditions of Hurricane Iselle, the trail maintenance project will be extended an additional week from Aug 18-22nd. Please contact the Park Visitor Center at (808) 326-9057 for additional information.

Coral Reef Studies and Products

Kaloko Pond reconstruction.
Recent Kaloko Pond reconstruction.
NPS photo.
 

The park's recent marine and freshwater reports include, in part:

Ball, F. 1977. Benthic marine algae of the coastal waters of Puukohola Heiau National Historic Site. Tech. Report #16, Coop. National Park Resources Study Unit, Dept. of Botany, Univ. of Hawai`i , Honolulu, Hawai`i . 12 pp.

Brasher, A. 1996. Ichthyological survey of selected ponds on the Island of Hawai`i .

Brasher, A. 1999. Development of a monitoring program to assess physical, chemical and biological components of Kaloko Fishpond at Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park on the Island of Hawai`i .

Cheney, D., D. Hemmes and R. Nolan. 1977. Physiography and marine fauna of inshore and intertidal areas in Puukohala Heiau National Historic Site. Tech. Report #13, Coop. National Park Resources Study Unit, Dept. of Botany, Univ. of Hawai`i , Honolulu, Hawai`i . 36 pp.

Doty, M. 1969. The ecology of Honaunau Bay, Hawai`i . University of Hawai`i , Hawai`i Botanical Science Paper No. 14.

Ludwig, G.M., L.R. Taylor, Jr., and D.M. Imose. 1980. Summer census of the reef-fish community of waters adjacent to Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park Summers 1974-1978. Honolulu, Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit University of Hawaii at Manoa: 46.

Parrish, J., G. Smith, and J. Norris. 1990. Resources of the marine waters of Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park. University of Hawai`i Cooperative Ecosystem Technical Report 74.

Peterson, John A. and Maria Ka’imopono Orr. 2005. I ‘Ono Ke Kole, I’a Ono Ke Kole – Sweet Conversation, Sweet-Tasting Fish: A Marine Ethnography of Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., Honolulu. Final report prepared for National Park Service. NPS Contract No. C8298030001

Did You Know?

Coconut tree

Did you know, the coconut tree was an extremely important resource brought to Hawaii by the early Polynesians. It was a source of food and water, used for building homes and rope making, and was also a musical instrument. Cutting down the coconut grove of another was considered an act of war.