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    John Muir

    National Historic Site California

Park Planning

Muir/Strentzel Gravesite Public Scoping Period Underway
Public Open House To Be Held April 9th

John Muir National Historic Site is announcing the public scoping period for the Muir/Strentzel Gravesite planning. Public scoping comments will be used to assist the park in developing a range of reasonable and feasible project alternatives that address management of resources and visitor access at the Muir/Strentzel gravesite in Martinez California. The public scoping period officially opened on March 6, 2013 and will extend for at least 60 days.

To help gather information related to this planning effort, a public open house will take place on April 9, 2013 from 5:30 to 7pm at New Leaf: A Sustainable Living Collaborative School, Room Two, 614 F Street, Martinez.

Comment submission information:

Comments can be submitted at public meetings, by mail, fax, email, and through the National Park Service's Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) commenting system.

· Planning, Environment, and Public Comment website: http://parkplanning. nps.gov/parkHome.cfm?parkID= 309

· Fax: 925-838-9471

· Email: Gretchen Stromberg by clicking here.

· Mail:

John Muir National Historic Site
Attn: Muir/Strentzel Gravesite Planning
4202 Alhambra Avenue
Martinez, CA 94553

The Muir/Strentzel gravesite is located approximately one-mile south of the Muir house. The 1.27-acre parcel is surrounded by post WWII-era single-family residences to the north, west and south, and bounded by Alhambra Creek to the southeast. The parcel contains a historic pear orchard and a small family burial area including the gravesite of John Muir.

The original John Muir National Historic Site was established in 1964 and was comprised of the Muir House, the Martinez Adobe, and their surrounding grounds. In 1980, the National Park Service conducted a study to assess the feasibility of adding the gravesite to the John Muir National Historic Site. At that time the 1.27-acre parcel was owned by the Muir-Hanna Family Trust. In 1988, Congress passed legislation to include the Muir/Strentzel gravesite property within the boundary of John Muir National Historic Site. In 1991, the National Park Service completed a General Management Plan for the entire National Historic Site that included a conceptual strategy for managing the gravesite parcel (at that time the property was still owned by the Muir-Hanna Family Trust). In 1993, the American Land Conservancy purchased the property from the Trust with the intent of transferring it to the National Park Service when funds became available. The National Park Service acquired the gravesite property in 2000.

According to its founding legislation, John Muir National Historic Site was established as a public memorial honoring the memory of John Muir for his contributions to the nation in land conservation and for his crusading efforts in advancing the cause of the national parks. The purpose of this plan is to further this legislative charge by providing public access to the Muir/Strentzel Gravesite, John Muir's final resting place and an important part of the National Historic Site which to this day has remained largely inaccessible to the public. In addition to enhancing the realization of the legislated mission of John Muir National Historic Site, the purpose of this plan is to fulfill the broader NPS mission related to the management of natural and cultural resources under its care, and to plan for all of the aforementioned in a manner that respects surrounding landowners who live in close proximity to the Gravesite.

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

John Muir not only has a National Historic Site and Muir Woods National Monument named for him, but schools, hospitals, plants, a rock type, a mammal, a bird, a butterfly, trails, a pass, a glacier, a wilderness area, a beach, an inlet, a mountain, and he's even on the 2005 California state quarter!