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    Jefferson

    National Expansion Memorial Missouri

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  • Pedestrian Access to the Gateway Arch From Downtown

    Pedestrian traffic on the Chestnut, Market St. and Pine St. bridges are closed. This leaves Walnut St. as the only point of entry to the Arch grounds from the city. If you park in the Arch garage there is access from the north end of the park. See maps. More »

Photo Mural 12

Banner for Lewis and Clark Murals
 
Confluence of the Milk and Missouri Rivers (Montana)

Confluence of the Milk and Missouri Rivers (Montana)

Thursday May 9th 1805.

"Capt. C. killed 2 bucks and 2 buffaloe,...we saved the best of the meat, and from the cow I killed we saved the necessary materials for making what our wrighthand cook Charbono calls the boudin blanc, and immediately set him about preparing them for supper; this white pudding we all esteem one of the greatest delacies of the forrest, it may not be amiss therefore to give it a place. About 6 feet of the lower extremity of the large gut of the Buffaloe is the first morsel that the cook makes love to,... the mustle lying underneath the shoulder blade next to the back, and fillets are next saught, these are needed up very fine with a good portion of kidney suit [suet]; to this composition is then added a just proportion of pepper and salt and a small quantity of flour...all is compleatly filled with something good to eat, it is tyed at the other end,...it is then baptised in the missouri with two dips and a flirt, and bobbed into the kettle; from whence after it be well boiled it is taken and fryed in bears oil until it becomes brown, when it is ready to esswage the pangs of a keen appetite or such as travelers in the wilderness are seldom at a loss for.-"

Meriwether Lewis



The above quote is taken directly from the Gary Moulton, University of Nebraska version of the Lewis and Clark Journals.

 
 
 

Did You Know?

Drawing of Dred Scott from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 1857

In 1846, a slave named Dred Scott sued for his freedom at the St. Louis Courthouse. His case went all the way to the Supreme Court, where the verdict set the stage for the Civil War. Today, the Old Courthouse is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Click to learn more about Dred Scott. More...