• Looking up at the Gateway Arch

    Jefferson

    National Expansion Memorial Missouri

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  • Pedestrian Access to the Gateway Arch From Downtown

    Pedestrian traffic on the Chestnut, Market St. and Pine St. bridges are closed. This leaves Walnut St. as the only point of entry to the Arch grounds from the city. If you park in the Arch garage there is access from the north end of the park. See maps. More »

The Art of Bryan Haynes

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Date: April 18, 2013
Contact: Ann Honious, 314-655-1614

The first and second levels of the Old Courthouse Rotunda will be enlivened with approximately 30 canvas prints depicting Native Americans, early settlers, explorers, local lore, and Missouri landscapes, painted in the New Regionalist style. In addition, the crooks and hollows, bends and curves of the Missouri landscape will be seen in the form of the preliminary drawings and sketches for each of the works of art, showing the development of each piece from conceptual thumbnail sketch to completed painting.

Artist Bryan Haynes, a native St. Louisan, attended the Art Center College of Design in California. After beginning a freelance commercial art career he returned to his native state of Missouri, where he developed and honed a style which is evocative not only of the state's history but also of its great artists. Haynes presents narratives of the land and people from a perspective both rooted in history and sculpted in current design. Jefferson National Expansion Memorial worked with Haynes previously on a painting that is located at the Gateway Arch Ticket Center.

TREES/WATER/SKY-A Walk Through Missouri-The Art of Bryan Haynes will be on display from May 23, 2013 through January 12, 2014 in the Old Courthouse, 11 North Fourth Street, and is free and open to the public. 

The Gateway Arch and the Old Courthouse are part of Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, located on the riverfront in downtown St. Louis. The Old Courthouse is open daily from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with the exception of Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. Admission is FREE of charge. For additional information, call 314/655-1700 or visit www.nps.gov/jeff. 

Did You Know?

Drawing of Dred Scott from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 1857

In 1846, a slave named Dred Scott sued for his freedom at the St. Louis Courthouse. His case went all the way to the Supreme Court, where the verdict set the stage for the Civil War. Today, the Old Courthouse is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Click to learn more about Dred Scott. More...