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    National Expansion Memorial Missouri

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    Pedestrian traffic on the Chestnut, Market St. and Pine St. bridges will be closed. This leaves Walnut St. and Washington Ave. as the Arch grounds points of entry to and from the city. See link for maps. More »

The Adventures of Jim Beckwourth- African American Frontiersman

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Date: February 12, 2007
Contact: Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, 314-655-1700

During National African American Month , Jefferson National Expansion Memorial will honor the rich heritage of African Americans and pay tribute to their many contributions to the nation through a month long series of free performances and presentations. 

 

The Adventures of Jim Beckwourth: African American Frontiersman will be presented on Friday, February 16: 9:30 and 11:00 (School Groups & Public) and Saturday, February 17: 10:30 and 1:00 (General Public).  Gregory Carr, a local actor and Director of the Griot Theater, will explore the colorful life of Jim Beckwouth, a famous mountain man who did it all, form fur trappers to buffalo hunter to blazing new trails to even becoming  Indain Chief.

 

The Museum of Westward Expansion, located beneath the Gateway Arch along the St. Louis riverfront, is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The Historic Old Courthouse, located at 11 North Fourth Street, St. Louis, is open daily from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. All programs are free and open to the public. Community and School groups wishing to attend must make a reservation. To make reservations and for a free calendar of the 2007 African American Heritage Program Series, call (314) 655-1700 weekdays, or 7-1-1 voice/TTY Telecommunications Relay Service

Did You Know?

Drawing of Dred Scott from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 1857

In 1846, a slave named Dred Scott sued for his freedom at the St. Louis Courthouse. His case went all the way to the Supreme Court, where the verdict set the stage for the Civil War. Today, the Old Courthouse is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Click to learn more about Dred Scott. More...