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    Independence

    National Historical Park Pennsylvania

The President's House Site

President's House

Residence of Washington in High Street, Phila., by William L. Brenton, c 1830. Courtesy, Private Collection

Independence National Historical Park

The President's House : Freedom and Slavery in the Making of a New Nation

HISTORY OF THE PRESIDENT'S HOUSE SITE

THE PRESIDENTS HOUSE - WASHINGTON AND ADAMS

ENSLAVED PEOPLE IN THE HOUSEHOLD OF GEORGE AND MARTHA WASHINGTON

ARCHEOLOGY METHODS AND INTERPRETATION OF THE SITE

The President's House podcast audio

In the 1790s, at the President's House location at Sixth and Market Streets, Presidents George Washington and John Adams lived and conducted their executive branch business. Washington brought some of his enslaved Africans to this site and they lived and toiled with other members of his household during the years that our first president was guiding the experimental development of the young nation toward modern, republican government.

The rediscovery of this slave-holding information led to engagement by members of the public and the U.S. House of Representatives Report 107-564 of 2003 which "urges the National Park Service to appropriately commemorate concerns" of those historical events. The historical commemoration came to be entitled "The President's House: Freedom and Slavery in Making a New Nation." This project, is located adjacent to the Liberty Bell Center, is a joint cooperation between the National Park Service and the City of Philadelphia

The commemoration contributes to the growing international network of historic sites that present race and slavery. The site opened in December 2010.




President George Washington called the elegant three story brick mansion "the best single house in the city." Both Presidents Washington (1790–1797) and John Adams (1797–1800) lived and worked in this house, which was rented from the financier Robert Morris. Washington's large household, including enslaved African descendents, contrasted with Adams' small household. Adams never owned slaves.

The President's house in the 1790s was a mirror of the young republic, reflecting both the ideals and contradictions of the new nation. The house stood in the shadow of Independence Hall, where the words "All men are created equal" and "We the People" were adopted, but they did not apply to all who lived in the new United States of America

Explore the links below for more history

New Exhibit Opens at Independence NHP (NPS story) pdf

Our Facebook page for up to the minute information on the President's House site

The President's House previous wayside exhibit (pdf)

City of Philadelphia President's House website

The President's House Site Bulletin (pdf printable / download

The President's House timeline and Information (pdf)

Official White House link on President Washington

Official White House link on President Adams



 

 
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"The President's House Site is on Independence Mall, near the Liberty Bell Center and Independence Hall"
Credit: Photo by H. Rumph Jr. for GPTMC

"Ribbon Cutting, from left to right: Michael Coard, Superintendent Cynthia MacLeod, Mayor Michael Nutter, Joyce Wilkerson, Clarence Armbrister, Shirley Graham"
Credit: Photo by M. Edlow for GPTMC
"The President's House Site is on Independence Mall, near the Liberty Bell Center and Independence Hall"
Credit: Photo by H. Rumph Jr. for GPTMC


"Ribbon Cutting, from left to right: Michael Coard, Superintendent Cynthia MacLeod, Mayor Michael Nutter, Joyce Wilkerson, Clarence Armbrister, Shirley Graham"
Credit: Photo by M. Edlow for GPTMC
GPTMC
 

Did You Know?

Painting of George Washington

In the summer of 1793 “ten thousand people in the streets of Philadelphia … threatened to drag Washington out of his house, and effect a Revolution in Government” but an outbreak of yellow fever dispersed the mob and saved the national government. (J Adams to T Jefferson, June 30, 1813)