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Writing Outside

July 25, 2012 Posted by: Lanxi

Went to the computer lab today.  Typed and printed some of our writing.  Began a journal entry with sentence fragments - that's how tired I am; writing makes me tired.  I have absolutely no stamina whatsoever.

What a grammatically incorrect paragraph.  I can already tell this will not be my best journal entry, even though I am writing it outside and probably look like a very smart person to passing pedestrians.  People that write outside (as opposed to walking, playing, or sitting and talking) always look smart as they're doing it. 

I should write outside more often.

Even though I'm writing in complete sentences, you can still tell I'm tired.  I haven't used one descriptive metaphor yet, not once.


4 Comments Comments Icon

  1. Peggy - Natchitoches, Louisiana
    July 26, 2012 at 01:39

    Your notes remind me a character in Mark Twain's story called "The Pickwick Papers." A person who was taking notes for the club, whereever they had adventures, made people around him really nervous about why he was watching them and what he was writing...

  2. Larry - Pennsylvania
    July 25, 2012 at 08:39

    I never really thought about it before, but you are correct. People writing outside do look smart. A writing teacher told me once to write whenever you can and not to worry about how it sounds, just write. Every time you write you get a little bit better. BTW, I think that writing while you are tired shows stamina.

  3. MRS. E - PENNSYLVANIA
    July 25, 2012 at 06:52

    Writing outside sounds like fun. Were you in a park or just on a city street? I wouldn't be able to get much done on a city street....too much of a people watcher.

  4. Mrs. Asprakis - Philadelphia, PA
    July 25, 2012 at 05:53

    Your sense of humor is so refreshing.

 

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