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All I want to say is...They don't really care about us

July 15, 2013 Posted by: Jorden

A lot of people will never care about 23 Philadelphia public schools closing.  Why will they never care?  It does not have any affect on their lives.  The majority of parents that send their children to private schools will not fight for the little girl who may have to walk 30 minutes to get to school.  That's why it is our job to use eloquent force and direct action in order to save our kids, save our schools, and save our teachers.  To succeed in today's competitive world or to to get into the college of your dreams, education is a necessity.  Graduates are coming from all over the world to take your son's or daughter's spot in our own colleges.  Officials will never think about the big picture so we have to draw it for them.  We have to run fundraisers, we have to join hands and let our cry be heard by every man and woman in Philadelphia.  The change starts with us.  We cannot give up.  Schools like Bok and Shaw have been around since my mother was a child.  The District has pre-meditated thoughts that successful kids do not come from their schools; let's prove this wrong.  Yes this is about money, but if we can build new prisons and a new 9/11 museum, we can keep our schools alive.


17 Comments Comments Icon

  1. Steve - Philadelphia, PA
    July 25, 2013 at 09:33

    Jordan, Congratulations on a passionate and well-written piece. I see by the responses that your voice has reached quite a distance from Philadelphia. People are not only hearing you, they are paying attention to your message. You are working hard at the craft of writing, and you've put yourself in a position (the NPS Project Write workshop) that gives your voice amplification. This is a powerful combination, and the fact that you've begun to discover and harness it at this point in your life gives you a head-start on many people. Thomas Jefferson would be proud.

  2. Amber - Philadelphia, PA
    July 25, 2013 at 12:27

    I acknowledge your hunger for justice. This sounds like a piece that could be the beginning of a great movement. Flesh out your ideas and continue. You are right... don't give up!

  3. Sunflower - Philadelphia, PA
    July 19, 2013 at 09:26

    Your cause is just. The pen in many cases, is mightier than the sword. Most of the social reform that has taken place in United States history is because people who feel injustice by the government have made their voices heard. Words and voices are often more powerful than votes and politicians. Use the fundamental rights to free speech, free press and peaceful assembly. Use Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell as symbols. They were powerful symbols for abolitionists, suffragists and civil rights leaders. In fact, the whole reason they are symbols is that they continue to be used. Consider this challenge as a torch being passed to you from generations before who have fought injustice and paved the way for social reform! Do that, and you keep the revolutionary spirit alive!

  4. Tricia - West Chester, PA
    July 18, 2013 at 09:40

    Dear Jordan, it is hard to see the caring sometimes when systems don't provide the support. And you are brave and correct to raise this issue and demand that we all give it more attention. You motivate everyone who does care and is working to give the School District of Philadelphia (and other districts) the support it(they) deserve(s). More importantly, you motivate yourself to never take second-best and to use civil discourse to express your opinion and be heard. Good for you.

  5. Erin - Philadelphia, PA
    July 17, 2013 at 08:55

    You create a strong case for concern about school closings. At the end of your essay, you mention building new prisons, and I am curious about exactly what you are referring to. I think it would help me as a reader to have this explained in more detail.

  6. Pat - Staten Island, NY
    July 17, 2013 at 05:37

    Remembering an old bumper sticker "It will be a great day when our schools get all the money they need and the air force has to hold a bake sale to buy a bomber." Some of us have always cared.

  7. Catherine - Philadelphia, PA
    July 16, 2013 at 05:55

    A truly ardent piece and a wonderful representation of our crisis today. I get the hint: "the little girl who may have to walk 30 minutes to get to school," comes from personal experience. Nonetheless, is the answer to the problem you propose "Why will [the School District] never care" solely because, "It does not have any effect on their lives" ?

  8. Anne-Marie - Philadelphia, PA
    July 16, 2013 at 04:11

    It is not that they do not care or are unaware of the ripple effects that closing a school has on the surrounding community?

  9. John - Seneca Falls, NY
    July 16, 2013 at 02:29

    Jorden: Caring requires knowing or being aware of another person's situation. In Seneca Falls (located about six hours from Philadelphia) I am bombarded with information through the internet and social media. I was not aware of the school closings, but I am aware of the struggles which my wife and I endure to pay for our daughter's education. We choose to send our daughter to private school -- not because we are rich, but because we want our daughter to receive an education which we believe conforms to our worldview. Keep up the great the great work before you!

  10. Amy - Lowell, MA
    July 16, 2013 at 02:00

    Our World needs more people like you who are willing to act and stand up for what they believe. How might you begin to make the change you seek?

  11. Roxanne - Reno, Nevada
    July 16, 2013 at 11:01

    Eloquent force and direct action are needed, I agree. The people need to stand together and encourage activism. Not just students and parents, but the entire community. Everyone is affected by the educational system. I like how you admit that the "change starts with us." We can't leave it up to anybody else.

  12. Al - Aldan, PA
    July 15, 2013 at 09:08

    Jorden, you raise so many good points. I guess the question is, how do we make them care? Don't give up. Even if you have to move to a new school, succeed. One day we will tell "them" we no longer need that prison, let's turn it into a school or a museum!

  13. Cameron - Boston, MA
    July 15, 2013 at 07:46

    Strong public education must be at the core of this nations focus if we are going to continue to be a contributor in the global future. Not for test scores or even college acceptances, but for thoughtful, proactive, aware humans to rise up into leadership roles. I love the idea of eloquent force, Jorden. As a parent of someone just starting in a public school, I'm beginning to see that I will have to fight and advocate for him and for his school far more than my parents had to for me. Hold onto your fire and your words. The combination will serve you well.

  14. Bethany - Philadelphia, PA
    July 15, 2013 at 06:36

    Hi Seymour - When I read the post, I thought that when Jorden discussed 'eloquent force', 'direct action', and joining 'hands to let our cry be heard', she was calling for activism as well as bake sales and fundraisers. I wonder if that was her intention?

  15. Seymour - Falls River, New Jersey
    July 15, 2013 at 04:55

    You state the problem, but how would you solve it. Bake sales and fundraisers will not help enough. Think of modern ways to save the schools.

  16. MRS. E - FALLS, PENNSYLVANIA
    July 15, 2013 at 04:47

    Jorden, I like your passion. Do not ever lose it. We must educate our children for the short term, for higher education but also for the long term, to be our leaders, law makers, doctors, inventors and parents of the future. I agree that we need good schools for every child.

  17. Renee - Philadelphia
    July 15, 2013 at 03:31

    I am glad that you value education!

 

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Photo of Justice Bell

The Justice Bell is an early replica of the Liberty Bell. Ordered during the Women’s Suffrage Movement by Katharine Ruschenberger, it traveled all over as a symbol of suffrage. Now it rests at Valley Forge. Women gained the right to vote with the 19th Amendment in 1920.