• Harry S Truman National Historic Site

    Harry S Truman

    National Historic Site Missouri

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Oral Histories: T

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Tinnin, Karen
Interviewed May 22, 1997

Karen Tinnin was a permanent employee of the Harry S Truman National Historic Site from 1985-2007. During her employ, she was actively involved in the creation, improvements, and management of the Truman Home in Independence, Missouri in her role as park ranger and later, Chief of Interpretation.

Interview Not Transcribed

 
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Truman, Fred L.
Interviewed June 18, 1991

Fred L. Truman, son of J. Vivian and Luella Truman and nephew of Harry S Truman, discusses the Truman family and life on the Truman farm in Grandview, where he spent many years. Truman relates the importance of Harry S Truman as a member of the larger Truman family rather than as a national political figure.

Interview (pdf - 278KB)

 
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Truman, Gilbert and Harry A.
Interviewed July 29, 1991

Gilbert and Harry A. Truman were the sons of John Vivian Truman, the President's brother. They discuss life on and around the two Truman farms in Grandview, Missouri. Harry A. lived in the Truman Farm Home from 1946 to 1955 and talks about the modifications made to the house to make it "modern."

Interview Not Transcribed

 
Mary Higbee Truman

Mary Higbee Truman

Truman, Mary H.
Interviewed July 29, 1991

Mary Higbee Truman met Harry S Truman when he was Jackson County judge, and she later married his nephew, John C. Truman. Truman shared stories about family activities such as Sunday dinners in Grandview at the Truman farm, inaugurations, vacations at the White House, and VIP tours of the capitol.

Interview (pdf - 120KB)
Appendix (pdf - 787KB)

 
Millie Twyman

Millie Twyman

Twyman, Millicent
Interviewed July 10, 2003

Millicent Twyman discusses the neighborhood relationships and the protectiveness of the Trumans by those closest to them.

Interview Not Transcribed

 

Did You Know?

View of the Mitsubishi Torpedo Plant in Nagasaki,following the atomic bomb explosion. Credit: Truman Library.

The United States dropped two atomic bombs on Japan in early August 1945. After the second bomb was dropped, President Truman stopped the bombing program even though Japan had not yet surrendered.