• Architectural details from the Holly Site

    Hovenweep

    National Monument CO,UT

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  • GPS Users

    Using GPS to find your way to Hovenweep is not recommended. Since Hovenweep has 6 different units with numerous paved and dirt roads intesecting each other, GPS will send visitors to unknown locations other than to the park. Using a map is recommended.

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Are you looking for a picture of Hovenweep for your website, publication, school project, or viral video? Visit our Flickr page where you can download public domain images for free.

 

Are you curious about who writes our social media messages? Meet the people behind the initials:

 
(sb) on rock ledge

Sara (sb) in a tight place

Visitors are often surprised to see a law enforcement ranger greeting them at the visitor center front desk, but that's what you get in a park this small. At the impressionable age of 12, Sara (sb) met the ranger living at Keet Seel in Navajo National Monument and thought that was the coolest job ever... and now she is living that dream. When asked how she handles working and living in the middle of nowhere, her response comes easily: "Look at my office and backyard."
 
Ranger (to) swearing in new Junior Rangers

Todd (to) swearing in new Junior Rangers

Todd (to) knew by the age of nine that being a park ranger was his calling. His career is now in its 25th year and has been even better than he dreamed it would be. "The best part is being able to help visitors find a connection to these unique natural and cultural resources either through a story or a short conversation. I am honored to be part of the web team because this is a tremendous opportunity to reach out to visitors and inspire them into making the journey to these unique landscapes." If you happen to see Todd on one of the trails at Hovenweep or Natural Bridges, stop to talk to him -- he just might have a good story to tell.

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Pinyon pines do not produce pine nuts every year. These delicious nuts can only be harvested every three to seven years. This irregular schedule prevents animals from adapting to an abundance of pine nuts and guarantees that at least some nuts will become new pine trees instead of a quick meal.