• A plush carpet of green grass covering the Mound City Group in summer

    Hopewell Culture

    National Historical Park Ohio

Laws & Policies

Permits

For information on organized First Amendment Rights activities, commercial filming or photography and to distribute written materials on park grounds, please visit the Permits section. There you will find downloadable forms for a Special Use Permit and a Commercial Filming/Still Photography Permit.

See Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) section below for issues pertaining to UAS (aka Drones) permits and operations on park property.

 

Firearms, Weapons & Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)

Legislation: As of February 22, 2010, a new federal law allows people who can legally possess firearms under applicable federal, state, and local laws to legally possess firearms in this park. Firearms and other dangerous weapons* are not permitted in any building on park grounds including the Mound City Group visitor center and the Hopewell Mound Group restroom facilities. Refer to Section 512 of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, Public Law 111-24, 123 Stat. 1764-65 (last section, bottom of document).

Park User Responsibility: It is the responsibility of visitors to understand and comply with all applicable state, local, and federal firearm laws before entering this park. Firearms are not permitted to be discharged on park property. As a starting point, please see the Ohio Code, Chapter 2923.

Weapons Prohibited in Federal Facilities: Federal law prohibits firearms and other dangerous weapons* in any building on park grounds; those places are marked with signs at all public entrances. Firearms and other dangerous weapons* are not permitted in any park building, including the Mound City Group visitor center and the Hopewell Mound Group restroom facility. Refer to 18 U.S.C. § 930.

For More Information on Firearms: See the state of Ohio's website at http://www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov/Enforcement/Concealed-Carry.

Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS): aka Drones or remotely piloted aircraft. Operation of any type of UAS inside of the park's boundaries is strictly forbidden. All permit applications requesting permission to operate UAS within park property or airspace will be denied.

* The term "dangerous weapon" means a weapon, device, instrument, material or substance, animate or inanimate, that is used for, or is readily capable of, causing death or serious bodily injury, except that such term does not include a pocket knife with a blade of less than 2&1/2" in length. 18 US Code 930, g2

 

Superintendent's Compendium

The Superintendent's Compendium is the summary of park specific rules implemented under the discretionary authority of the park Superintendent. This document includes park designations, closures, permit requirements, and other restrictions for Hopewell Culture National Historical Park.

 
President Warren G. Harding

Warren G. Harding was the 29th President of the United States.  He was born and raised in Ohio.

Image courtesy of Ohio Statehouse

Enabling Legislation

The present Hopewell Culture National Historical Park evolved in part from the former Mound City Group National Monument. The national monument was established by a proclamation signed by President Warren G. Harding in 1923 to preserve prehistoric mounds of "great historic and scientific interest." In 1980 Congress expanded the monument, adding a portion of the Hopeton Earthworks and directed the National Park Service to investigate other regional archeological sites for their suitability for preservation. Four sites were recommended. Hopewell Culture National Historical Park was established on May 27, 1992 by a law that renamed the Mound City Group National Monument, expanded the Hopeton Eathworks unit, and authorized the acquisition of three additional sites: High Bank Works, Hopewell Mound Group, and Seip Earthworks.

Did You Know?

Pink heelsplitter mussel

Freshwater mussels were an important resource for Hopewellian people. They were used as food, provided pearls for ornaments and shells were utilized for hoes. Although plentiful during the Middle Woodland period, over-harvesting and low water quality have reduced their numbers drastically today. Many freshwater mussels are on the State and Federal Endangered Species list. More...