• A cool & crisp autumn sunrise at the Mound City Group

    Hopewell Culture

    National Historical Park Ohio

Reptiles

Try looking on the forest floor for a box turtle.
Eleven reptiles have been documented on park land including three Ohio State Species of Concern: eastern garter snake, eastern box turtle, and false map turtle. These ecotherms, organisms that regulate their body temperature through behavior such as sunning, wait for the warmer weather before becoming active. Once conditions are right, a moist, forest floor may stir with activity from eastern box turtles, brown snakes, and eastern garter snakes. After scanning the ground, be sure to look up and check to see if any black rat snakes may be out sunning in the trees. Along the Scioto River or Paint Creek, the sound of splashing may mark the hasty retreat of sunning common map turtles or spiny softshell turtles. In open areas, racers may also be out and about. Other reptiles to keep an eye out for are milksnakes, northern water snakes, and common snapping turtles. These animals are generally secretive in nature, therefore spotting them takes patience and keen observational skills, but is usually well worth the effort.
 
View the Reptiles Species List for the park.

Did You Know?

State Route 104 entrance

Established on March 2nd, 1923 as Mound City Group National Monument, the park was the first federally created National Park Service site in Ohio. President Warren G. Harding, a native of Ohio, established the national monument using powers granted to him under Section 2 of the 1906 Antiquities Act. The park was eventually re-named Hopewell Culture National Historical Park on May 27th, 1992 after congressional legislation was approved in the House and the Senate. More...