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 [graphic] National Register Bulletin How to Complete the National Register Multiple Property Documentation Form

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U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service

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III. COMPLETING THE MULTIPLE PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION FORM

IV. COMPILING MULTIPLE PROPERTY SUBMISSIONS

V. AMENDING MULTIPLE PROPERTY SUBMISSIONS


III. COMPLETING THE MULTIPLE PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION FORM

The National Register Multiple Property Documentation Form documents groups of thematically related properties. This form defines and describes one or more historic contexts, describes associated property types related to the historic context(s), and establishes significance and integrity requirements for nominating properties to the National Register.

The following instructions are organized to correspond to sections of the Multiple Property Documentation Form.

Above: The first page of the National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Documentation form (OMB No. 1024-0018). These can be ordered or downloaded from the National Register of Historic Places Publications Order Form page. Below: The second side of the form.

Above: Second side of The National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Documentation Form (OMB No. 1024-0018). These can be ordered or downloaded from the National Register of Historic Places Publications Order Form page.

Name of Multiple Property Listing

Associated Historic Contexts

Form Prepared By

Certification

Statement of Historic Contexts(s)

Associated Property Type(s)

Geographical Data

Summary of Identification and Evaluation Methods

Major Bibliographical References

Additional Documentation

Guidelines for Continuation Sheets

 

NAME OF MULTIPLE PROPERTY LISTING

A. Name of Multiple Property Listing

In the space provided on Section 1 of the form, enter a name that identifies the thematic group of properties being documented. The name should be based on the broad unifying themes, trends, or patterns that link properties within the submission, such as historic events, significant persons, architectural styles, archeological types, physical characteristics, or other common characteristics to which the group as a whole relates. The name also should identify the geographical area, such as a community or county, and cultural affiliation associated with the group. It may identify a time period as well.

If the listing is related to a small group of thematically related property types dispersed over a broad geographical area, select names such as Rural School Buildings in Washington State or Hopewell Ceremonial, Ritualistic, and Mortuary/Burial Structures in the Southern Ohio Watersheds. If the listing covers a variety of historic resources within geographical and temporal limits, a title such as The Indian Use of the Salt Pond Region between 4000 B.P. and 1750 A.D. ( B.P. stands for "before present," which gives the year 1950 as the "present,"1950 being the year that calibration curves were established) may be selected. If a listing is based on a survey for a specific geographical area, a general title such as the Historic Resources of Boneyfiddle, Ohio may be appropriate. Depending on the organization of the thematic group nomination and the properties it encompasses, the name of the multiple property listing may be the same as the name of the associated historic context.

EXAMPLES

Hohokam Platform Mound Communities of the Lower Santa Criz River Basin, Arizona, c.a. A.D. 1050-1450
Historic and Architectural Properties of Hudson, Ohio
Metal Mining and Tourist Era Resources of Boulder County, Colorado
Minnesota State Park CCC/WPA/Rustic Style Historic Resources

The Orin Porter House was included in a boundary increase for the Hudson Historic District, nominated as part of the multiple property submission, Historic and Architectural Properties of Hudson in Summit County, Ohio. The boundary increase was justified on the basis of its association with the development of the community's post-Civil War era railroad-based economy. The owner of the house, Orin Porter, was a significant architect associated with the architectural development of this section of the historic district. (Lois Newkirk)


GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR MULTIPLE PROPERTY SUBMISSIONS

  • A Multiple Property Documentation Form is a document for recording written statements of historic context and associated property types, thereby providing a framework for evaluating a thematic group of historic properties.
  • A multiple property submission may be based on one or more historic contexts.
  • The contents of a multiple property submission may be organized because:
  1. One or more historic contexts and related property types are represented.
  2. Related properties exist or are likely to exist in sufficient numbers to warrant registration in the multiple property format.
  3. It directly relates to the needs of Federal, State, or local preservation planning goals and priorities.
  • A historic context is a body of information about related properties organized by theme, place, and time.
  • The theme underlying the historic context may be based on one or several broad areas of significance, or on more specific events and activities or patterns of physical or cultural development related to one or several areas of significance.
  • The geographical area covered by a historic context is based on the location and extent of properties known or likely to exist or have existed related to the historic context, such as a community developed as a regional center of commerce, a river valley having a common pattern of cultural development, or an area across several states settled by one particular ethnic group.
  • The time period covered by a historic context is based on the period of time when the events significant to the historic context are known to have occurred.
  • A multiple property submission may cover any geographical scale--local, regional, State or national--and need not be the same level as that of the related historic contexts.
  • While a multiple property group or a historic context is organized at a specific geographical level, an individual property may be evaluated at another, often smaller, geographical level. If so, the property's relationship to its historic context must be considered.
  • A property type may relate to one or several historic contexts. The significance of a property type is based on a knowledge of its respective historic contexts.
  • A property type and its related properties may have significance in history, architecture, engineering, archeology, or culture, or a combination of these disciplines, and may meet one or more of the National Register criteria.
  • Multiple property listings may arise from historic contexts identified in the Federal, State, or local planning process.


GUIDELINES FOR ORGANIZING A MULTIPLE PROPERTY
SUBMISSION BASED ON A LOCAL SURVEY

Many multiple property submissions are based on surveys or inventories of historic, architectural, cultural, or archeological properties, particularly for communities. The following guidelines may be helpful in these cases:

  • Through a study of primary and secondary sources, predictive studies, field survey, and other techniques, compile information about the prehistory and history of the community and the existence of related historic resources.
  • Carefully analyze the information to identify the broad patterns and stages in the area's prehistory or history. Relate these to the National Register criteria and areas of significance. Consider:

1. Stages and patterns of area settlement and development, important events, and significant persons.

2. Aesthetic and artistic values embodied in architecture of art, craftsmanship, construction technology, or the style and work of a master.

3. Research values or problems related to the area's prehistory and history; social and physical sciences and humanities; local cultural interests.

  • Determine which historic patterns or developments can be studied on a local level, and which need to be studied in a larger geographical context, such as the State, region, or the nation as a whole. Consider the ways in which the patterns and stages of local development relate to the historic contexts that have been identified in the Statewide preservation planning process.
  • Define a particular period of time, geographical area, and theme to each major stage or pattern of development identifying a set of historic contexts that can be used to organize information about the history and prehistory of the locality and its related historic properties.
  • Document the locality's history and prehistory in Section E of the multiple property form, using the historic contexts as the framework for organizing the information.
  • The survey identifies various kinds of properties found in the local community or geographical area according to each historic context. Group these into property types based on their common physical or associative characteristics.
  • Document in section F of the Multiple Property Documentation Form. Using survey data and other information, describe the associative and physical characteristics that define each property type and discuss its significance to the historic context. Assess the qualities and condition of existing related properties. Determine the characteristics or qualities and the degree of historic integrity required for the registration of related properties in the National Register as a member of the property type.
  • Apply the registration requirements to each surveyed property possessing similar physical or associative characteristics. Compare the characteristics, qualities, and degree of integrity required for registration to that of each property to determine if it qualifies for registration as a member of the property type.
  • Document on a National Register registration form, each property determined to meet the registration requirements. Special instructions for properties submitted as part of a multiple property listing should be followed.
  • Organize the documentation for all or any combination of the historic contexts and property types, and the forms for each related property documented in step 8, into one or several multiple property submissions.


ASSOCIATED HISTORIC CONTEXT(S)

B. Associated Historic Contexts

(Name each associated historic context, identifying theme, geographical area, and chronological period for each.)

Main Street was included in the Gold Hill Historic District, a property nominated to the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Metal Mining and Tourist Era Resources of Boulder County, Colorado multiple property submission. Dating from the early 1870s, the Gold Hill Historic District is considered the most "intact representation of the early mountain community that developed as a result of the precious metal mining in Boulder County." (Deborah Abele)

Enter the name of the historic context(s) related to the multiple property submission and used in preparing the multiple property form. For each historic context, determine the appropriate theme, geographical area, and chronological period for each context.

Historic contexts may include those identified in the State historic preservation office comprehensive planning process. According to the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Archeology and Historic Preservation, historic contexts provide information that discusses the historical patterns and trends that produced individual properties. Historic contexts serve as the foundation for decisions about the identification, evaluation, registration, and treatment of historic properties. For further explanation of historic contexts, see discussion under section E of this bulletin.

EXAMPLES

Multiple Property Listing Historic Contexts
Hohokam Platform Mound Communities of the Lower Santa Cruz River Basin, Arizona, c.a. A.D. 1050-1450 The Foundation, Occupation, and Abandonment of Hohokam Platform Mound Communities of the Lower Santa Cruz River Basin, c.a. A.D. 1050-1450 (HC)

Historic and Architectural Properties of Hudson, Ohio (MPL)

  1. Pioneer Days and the Connecticut Influence, 1799-1825 (HC)
  2. Architectural and Historic Impact of Western Reserve College, 1825-1850 (HC)
  3. Railroad Prosperity; Merchant Builders, 1850-1907 (HC)
  4. Historic Restoration/Model Town, 1907-1925 (HC)
    Exurbia, 1925-1940 (HC)
Metal Mining and Tourist Era Resources of Boulder County, Colorado (MPL)
  1. Early Settlement and Community Development in the Mountain Region of Boulder County, 1858-1910 (HC)
  2. Recreation and Tourism in Boulder County's Mountain Region, 1900-1925 (HC)
Minnesota State Park CCC/WPA/Rustic Style Historic Resources (MPL)
  1. Landscape Architecture in Minnesota State Parks, 1933-1942 (HC)
  2. State Park Development in Minnesota State Parks, 1889-1942 (HC)
  3. Rustic Style Architecture in Minnesota State Parks, 1905-1942 (HC)
  4. CCC/WPA Federal Relief Programs in Minnesota State Parks, 1933-1942 (HC)



FORM PREPARED BY

C. Form Prepared by

name/title_______________________________________________________________________

organization_________________________________ date_________________________________

street & number___________________________ telephone_______________________________

city or town_______________state___________ zip code________________________________

Enter the name, title, organization, address, and daytime telephone number of the person who compiled the information contained in the documentation form. The SHPO, the Federal preservation office, or the National Park Service may contact this person if questions arise about the form or if additional information is needed.

Photo captions: The 1939 water tower is a contributing building in the National Register of Historic Places nomination of Lake Bronson State Park in Kittson County, Minnesota. The eligibility of the park was justified for its association with the Minnesota State Park CCC/WPA/Rustic Style Historic Resources multiple property submission. The historic resources of Lake Bronson State Park are significant as "outstanding examples of rustic style split construction." (Rolf T. Anderson)

 

CERTIFICATION

D. Certification

As the designated authority under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, I hereby certify that this documentation form meets the National Register documentation standards and sets forth requirements for the listing of related properties consistent with the National Register criteria. This submission meets the procedural and professional requirements set forth in 36 CFR Part 60 and the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Archeology and Historic Preservation. ( see continuation sheet for additional comments.)

Signature and title of certifying official ______________________________ Date ___________________

State or Federal agency and bureau ______________________________________

I hereby certify that this multiple property documentation form has been approved by the National Register as a basis for evaluating related properties for listing in the National Register.

Signature of the Keeper________________________________ Date of Action__________

The State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO), Federal Preservation Officer (FPO),Tribal Preservation Officer (TPO),or other Federal officials completes this section to certify the completeness of the information on the multiple property form and the fulfillment of the procedural and professional requirements for submission. The role of the SHPO, FPO, and other Federal officials, in each case, depends on several things: the action being requested, agency initiating the action, ownership of property, and requirements in 36 CFR Part 60.

To determine the appropriate certifying and commenting officials in a particular case, refer to the "Roles of Certifying and Commenting Officials) in Appendix VII of National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form. For a list of SHPOs, FPOs, and National Park Service regional offices, see Appendix IX of the same publication.

The State or Federal authority signs the statement and provides the date and the name of his or her agency or bureau. Upon approval of the form, the Keeper of the National Register will sign and date the form. Each individual property submitted as part of the multiple property submission is certified separately on its respective registration form.

Additional certifying officials should sign and date a continuation sheet containing the statement: "As the designated authority under the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended, I hereby certify that this documentation form meets the National Register documentation standards and sets forth requirements consistent with the National Register criteria for the listing of related properties. This submission meets the procedural and professional requirements set forth in 36 CFR Part 60 and the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Archeology and Historic Preservation. Local government officials, including those in CLGs, and other persons may express their opinions in a letter accompanying the form.

Although only the individual properties documented for eligibility as part of the listing will be registered in the National Register and included in the National Register Information System, the multiple property form will become a permanent part of the written records of the National Register. It is used as a basis for the evaluation of registration forms appended at the time of the initial submission and subsequently as additional properties are submitted.

By signing the form, a commenting official acknowledges that he or she has had the opportunity to comment on the action being requested and provides an opinion.

STATEMENT OF HISTORIC CONTEXT(S)

E. Statement of Historic Contexts

(If more than one historic context is documented, present them in sequential order.)

Provide a written narrative of the historic context(s) related to the multiple property submission. To qualify for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, a property must be significant; that is, it must represent a significant historic context in the history, architecture, archeology, engineering, or culture of an area, and it must have the characteristics that make it a good representative of properties associated with that context. Historic contexts are those patterns or trends in history by which a specific occurrence, property, or site is understood and its meaning (an ultimately its significance) within prehistory or history is made clear. Historians, architectural historians, folklorists, archeologists, and anthropologists use different words to describe these phenomena such as trend, pattern, theme, or cultural affiliation, but the concept is the same. The concept of historic context is not a new one; it has been fundamental to the study of history since the 18th century and, arguably, earlier than that. Its core premise is that resources, properties, or happenings in history do not occur in a vacuum but rather are part of larger trends or patterns.

For the multiple property submission, the statement of historic context is a written narrative that describes the unifying thematic framework. The historic context statement must be developed in sufficient depth to support the relevance, the relationships, and the importance of the properties to be considered. For the purposes of the National Register program, the statement of historic contexts requires a consistent framework: theme, geographical area, and chronological period. This organization provides for a standardized means of describing and explaining the significance of a wide variety of properties.

Depending on the nature of the historic properties and the informed judgment of the nomination preparer, the historic context may represent any one of a range of historical frames of reference. There are many ways in which to look at historic properties and thus many ways of documenting contexts. The approach should be determined by the purpose or need for evaluating and managing historic properties.

If there is a need to know more about particular kinds of resources, a thematic approach may be called for. Historic context may emphasize economic, social, and political forces, such as certain industries, arts, and literature, and military subjects. A historic context may be associated with the life of a person or groups of persons that influenced the destiny and character of a region. Architectural styles, building and structural types, and buildings materials and methods of construction may also serve as the organizing device for the historic context. Care should be taken not to define the context too narrowly so as to limit its applicability to preservation decision making. For example, a historic context covering three-story apartment houses will be far less useful than one defined by the general apartment house building type. Or, a historic context may be based on a research topic or archeological site type that will expand existing knowledge of an area's development, past cultural affiliation, and human activities and interaction.

If there is a need to know more about properties in a particular area, such as when a Certified Local Government wishes to survey and inventory the resources within its jurisdiction, then a geographically-based approach would be appropriate. A geographically-based historic context may be at the scale of a community, town, city, county, State, region, nation, or physiographic area and may treat all or some of the themes and periods in a given area. A management unit, such as a park, public forest, or transportation system, also may be a geographically-based historic context. For such historic contexts, prehistory and history prior to the establishment of the management unit should take into account patterns and trends beyond the modern boundaries. For geographically-based historic contexts, the following may be addressed: the developmental phases in the area's history; the economic, social, and political forces that affected the area's physical form, and factors that gave the community or area its own distinct character separate from that of like or other settlements.

If there is a need to know more about the properties of a particular period in history, a chronologically-based approach is called for. Such historic contexts may focus on a prehistoric period, such as a historic context devoted to prehistoric hunters and gatherers ca. 10,000-200 B.P. They also may focus on historical periods, such as the post-Civil War era, the Great Depression, or early settlement.

The discussion of historic context should introduce a definition of the property type, its locational patterns, and general characteristics. These topics are defined in greater detail in section F.

If more than one historic context is documented, they should be presented in sequential order. Normally, the the historic context(s) discussion stands as a discrete narrative section, followed by the property type(s) discussion. Depending on the nature of the historic properties, however, it may be advantageous to present each historic context followed by its corresponding property type before proceeding to the next historic context. The National Park Service will accept either approach to the order of these sections, provided that the requested information is included and clearly labeled.


GUIDELINES FOR DOCUMENTING A HISTORIC CONTEXT

The Secretary of the Interior's standards and Guidelines for Archeology and Historic Preservation offer the following steps for documenting a historic context:
  • Identify the concept (or theme), chronological period, and geographical area for the historic context.
  • Assemble information about the historic context:

1. Collect information about the prehistory or history of the geographical area encompassed by the historic context, including information about properties that have already been identified. Identify groups of properties that may have important roles in defining historic contexts and values.

2. Assess information to identify bias in historic perspective, methodological approach, or area of coverage.

  • Synthesize information. Prepare a written narrative of the historic context, providing a detailed synthesis of the data collected and analyzed. Important patterns, events, persons, architectural types and styles, or cultural values should be identified. Consider:

1. Trends in area settlement and development;

2. Aesthetic and artistic values embodied in architecture, construction, technology, or craftsmanship, and

3. Research values.

  • Define property types.

1. Identify property types that have relevance and importance in illustrating the historic context. Determine how the National Register criteria would apply to examples of each on the basis of the important patterns, events, persons, and cultural values discussed in the written narrative of historic context. Also, outline and justify the specific physical and associative characteristics and quality of historic integrity that an individual property must possess to be eligible for listing as a member of the property type.

2. Characterize the locational patterns of property types, that is, generalize about where particular types of property are likely to be found.

3. Characterize the current condition of known properties relating to each property type.


Background Information for Historic Contexts

Background information for historic contexts may include facts about:

  • Prehistoric cultural occupations.
  • Exploration and settlement.
  • The social and cultural environment.
  • The natural character of the area, including waterways, natural features, natural resources, climate, terrain, soil conditions, and its relationship to manmade development.
  • Development of transportation routes, commerce, industry, immigration, settlement patterns, the development/establishment of communities/towns and government.
  • Historic patterns and stages of community or regional growth.
  • Contemporary manmade character of the area, including population density, patterns of land use, nature of physical development, and general condition of cultural resources.

Historic Contexts Related to Historic or Prehistoric Trends and Patterns

For historic contexts related to historic or prehistoric trends and patterns of development such as commerce, industry, settlement, education, transportation, communication, etc., discuss:

  • The historical development characterizing the theme or themes on which the historic contexts are based, including major stages of growth, pivotal events, significant ethnic or personal associations, and political or legislative decisions.
  • Principal dates, events, activities, persons, associations, and developmental forces related to the contexts.
  • The relationship of cultural and environmental influences such as transportation, immigration, politics, commerce, industry, technology, communications, access to natural resources, climatic and soil conditions, and topography to the course of events related to the historic contexts.

Historic Contexts Related to an Individual or Group of Individuals

For historic contexts related to the life of an individual or a group of individuals, discuss:

  • The major achievements of the individual or individuals.
  • How the achievements or career influenced life in the locality, region, State, or nation.
  • The role of the individual or group in spreading a distinctive culture, religion, or philosophy throughout a geographical area.
  • The entirety of the individual's or group's career and its reflection in the historic properties.

Historic Contexts Related to Art, Architecture, Engineering, and Landscape Architecture

For historic contexts related to art, architecture, engineering, and landscape architecture, discuss:

  • Principal types, styles, time periods, and methods of construction on which the theme or themes underlying the historic contexts are based.
  • Principal architects, landscape architects, artists, builders, craftsmen, or designers identified with the historic contexts; if related to the work of one or a small group of artisans, the evolution and distinguishing features of their work.
  • The impact of architectural characteristics, such as scale, proportions, materials, workmanship, stylistic details, spatial arrangements, construction techniques, and aesthetic quality on the overall architectural character of a particular geographical area or period of time.
  • The relationship of cultural influences such as immigration, settlement, commerce, transportation, communications, developments in technology, and industrial developments to the development of style, type, and method of construction.
  • The relationship of environmental influences such as climate, natural features, soil conditions, and presence of natural resources to the development of style, type, or method of construction.

Historic Contexts Related to Prehistoric and Historical Archeology

For historic contexts related to prehistoric and historical archeology, discuss:

  • Types of archeological properties, including periods of time, related research topics, cultural affiliations, general physical characteristics, and probable kinds of important research data represented by the historic contexts.
  • Results of archeological, ethnographic, or historic research already conducted or otherwise pertinent to an understanding of the historic contexts and related property types.
  • Important categories of information known or believed to exist relative to the historic contexts.
  • Cultural and environmental influences that determined the location, distribution, and quality of sites or resources historically, and that have affected the potential of existing sites and resources to yield important information.
  • Research value and other uses of information and information categories likely to be yielded by a study of related property types.

ASSOCIATED PROPERTY TYPE(S)

F. Associated Property Types (provide description, significance, and registration requirements)

For each property type, provide the names, description, statement of significance, and registration requirements for National Register listing for each property type included in the multiple property listing. The property type description and statement of significance need not be lengthy if the information is already discussed in section E, but it should be summarized.

Property type ties the historic context to specific historic properties, so that National Register eligibility can be assessed. A property type is a grouping of individual properties characterized by common physical and/or associative attributes. Physical attributes include style, structural type, size, scale, proportions, design, architectural details, method of construction, orientation, spatial arrangement or plan, materials, workmanship, artistry, and environmental relationships. Care should be taken to not define property types too narrowly--according to a localized architectural feature, size, scale, feature, proportions, etc. Associative attributes include the property's relationship to important persons, activities, and events, based on information such as dates, functions, cultural affiliations, and relationship to important research topics.

Discuss the specific characteristics qualifying or disqualifying specific properties for listing. These characteristics may include physical or associative attributes or relate to integrity considerations. For purposes of discussion and analysis, it may be useful to divide some property types into subtypes. For example, in the Metal Mining and Tourist Era Resources of Boulder County, Colorado Multiple Property Listing, the property type vernacular domestic dwelling is divided into the subtypes: pioneer log, vernacular wood frame, and vernacular Victorian.

Property type analysis is a tool for evaluating related properties. The conclusion of this analysis is the registration requirements. The analysis also is useful for assessing variations within a particular property type. If subtypes are identified, registration requirements may be divided between the general qualifications for members of the types and more specific features of the subtypes. The analysis of subtypes will be more detailed, and therefore, more useful for the evaluation of identified properties. Property type analysis is not necessary on this form for unique or rare resources because the information can appear on the registration form within the multiple property submission.

A property type may include a variety of buildings and structures with diverse physical characteristics or may be based on distinguishable structural types or functions. Railroad-era Construction in Watrous could include commercial, industrial, civic, and residential buildings of the period as well as structures directly associated with the railroad. The property type, effigy mounds is limited to a specific archeological site type. Round barn is based on architectural form, whereas dairy farms and facilities is based on function and association with a specific agricultural activity.

Guidelines For Selecting Property Types

In selecting property types, consider the following:

  • Form, function, associations, events, or physical characteristics should be considered in selecting and determining the name of a property type.
  • The selection should be based on a knowledge of the relevant historic contexts, and then on whether or not the type is a manageable and efficient tool for evaluating eligibility for National Register listing.
  • Property types may be defined to include resources that are associated with the general growth or prosperity influenced by the theme and that are not directly resultant from the predominant theme of the context.
  • A property type may consist of one or more related structural types. The property type, Carnegie libraries in Iowa, would only include library buildings, whereas, railroad-era buildings and structures in Watrous could include commercial buildings, public buildings, residences, bridges, storage sheds, as well as railroad stations and freighthouses.
  • The fullest extent of the significant historic values of a group of related resources should be considered. For example, discussion of a round barn as a property type may concentrate on the resource's inherent architectural values while dairy farms and facilities recognizes a broader spectrum of significant and interrelated architectural and historical values.
  • A property type may include buildings, sites, structures, objects, historic districts, or any combination of these resources.
  • Historic districts may be a separate property type or may be included within a property type that combines it with other resources such as buildings and sites.
  • A property type may relate to one or more of the National Register criteria.
  • Base property types related to Criterion A on properties relating to an event or chain of events important in illustrating the historic context.
  • Base property types related to Criterion B on known properties associated with the productive life of a person important in the historic context.

Base property types related to Criterion C on one or a group of the following:

1. Properties having common architectural style, period, or method of construction.

2. The works of a master or related groups of masters.

3. Properties having common high artistic values.

4. Significant architectural features distinguishing one or more groups of buildings or structures.

  • Base property types related to Criterion D on one or a group of resources that are likely to yield important information about a common set of research questions important to the historic context.

Property Type Description

In concise narrative form, describe the physical characteristics and associative qualities that define each property type. Descriptions should discuss a combination of physical and associative characteristics. Physical or associative characteristics may be emphasized depending on the significance of the property type. Property types significant under Criteria A and B, for historical associations, will likely emphasize associative characteristics, whereas those under Criterion C will likely emphasize physical characteristics. Criterion D may emphasize associations with events, trends, or individuals; representatives of a group, or physical characteristics.

Consider:

  • Physical characteristics such as style, period, site or structural type, size, scale, proportions, design, architectural details, method of construction, siting, orientation, spatial arrangement or plan, materials, workmanship, artistry, and environmental relationships.

  • Associative characteristics such as the property's relationship to important activities, persons, or events, including information such as dates, functions, role, cultural affiliations, relationship to important research topics, and the presence of natural features or resources that helped determine location.

  • Geographical information such as the property's relationship to natural resources, climate, topographical features, and soil conditions that may have been relied upon for industry, transportation, defense, or subsistence, or that helped determine the siting, location, form, design, function, and materials of associated cultural resources.
  • The likely nature of boundaries for related properties and any special factors to be considered in selecting boundaries, such as the likelihood of the resource to exist in groups or in combination with other significant property types forming historic districts.
  • Variations occurring within the property type due to changing cultural, chronological, or geographical influences

  • Locational patterns of the property type, that is generalizations about the known or likely location, occurrence, and distribution of examples representing the property type.
  • Condition or expected condition of property types including:

1. Any inherent characteristics that are likely to contribute to or detract from its physical condition.

2. Any aspects of the social and natural environment that may affect its preservation or visibility.

  • Specific period of time and locations in which related properties are believed or known to have existed.

Property Type Significance

In narrative form, state the significance of the property type as it relates to each historic context listed in section B. The narrative should be a concise and factual summary of information directly relating the property type to:

  • Important aspects of its various historic contexts.
  • The various areas of significance and criteria for which properties may be listed in the National Register.
  • Significance in national, state, or local history.

Consider the following when discussing the significance of property types under Criteria A and B:

  • Important dates, events, activities, persons, associations, and developmental forces, trends, and patterns relating the property type to its relevant historic context(s).
  • Any direct relationship of the property type to major stages of growth, pivotal events or activities, or personal associations characterizing the historic context.

For properties significant under Criterion C, summarize the following:

  • Principal types, styles, and methods of construction illustrated by the property type and how these relate to the overall historic context(s).
  • Principal architects, artists, builders, craftsmen, designers, or landscape architects identified with the introduction and development of the property type.
  • Architectural characteristics, such as scale, proportions, materials, workmanship, stylistic details, spatial arrangement, construction techniques, and aesthetic quality, that give examples of the property type their significance.
  • Spatial relationships of resources to each other and the environment, including set backs, street plans, parks, squares, open spaces, structural density, plantings, natural features, and landscape architecture, if these are significant unifying features of the property type.

For property types significant under Criterion D, discuss the following:

  • Related research topics, cultural affiliations, general physical characteristics, and probable kinds of important research data that link the property type to its historic context(s).
  • Archeological, ethnographic, or historic research already conducted or otherwise pertinent to an understanding of the property type.
  • Important categories of information and related research topics about which properties related to the property type are likely to yield information.

For property types meeting Criteria Considerations, including properties less than 50 years old, religious properties, reconstructed and moved properties, commemorative properties, cemeteries and graves, or birthplaces, explain how these properties as a group meet the special requirements for listing called for in the National Register criteria considerations. (See National Register Bulletin: How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation for advice on Criteria Considerations.)

Property Type Registration Requirements

State the registration requirements based on the analysis of the data collected on the property type and known related properties in relationship to the National Register criteria, criteria considerations, and areas of significance. The requirements should provide specific information that can be used for comparing actual historic properties and for making judgments about their relative significance. Registration requirements involve not just integrity, but how well a specific property illustrates the property type and how it relates to the historic context.

Include the following in a discussion of registration requirements: the physical characteristics, associative qualities, or information potential that an example of the property type must possess to qualify for the National Register. This section should specify the aspects of integrity (location, design, setting, workmanship, materials, feeling, and association) and an explanation of how each aspect is defined for the specific property type. Base integrity requirements on an analysis of the property type and its significant features and a knowledge of representative properties and their relative integrity.

This section is intended to provide information on the unifying characteristics of the property type. Information common to the properties is placed in this section so that it need not be repeated in each individual National Register nomination.

EXAMPLES OF REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS

Name of property type: Bright Leaf Era Farmhouses and Tenant Houses.
(The example is from the Historic and Architectural Resources of Granville County MPS prepared by the North Carolina SHPO and emphasizes rural qualities and features as key registration requirements.)

Basically traditional structures--the largest group of traditional structures in the county with the possible exception of outbuildings--the surviving bright leaf era rural dwellings will usually meet registration requirements because of their traditional forms, floor plans and materials. Stylistic concerns are limited, though some larger farmhouses will meet registration requirements because they display a significant number of Italianate, Victorian, Colonial Revival or bungalow style features. In general, to qualify for registration, the dwellings should retain a rural setting and the forms, floor plans or materials that evoke their period of construction and the rural life of the time. More numerous than their predecessors, they should also retain a significant degree of stylistic integrity, where a style is present. The integrity of their association and feeling is greatly bolstered by the presence of contemporary outbuildings or later outbuildings that display forms and functions similar to their predecessors, particularly outbuildings associated with the raising of Bright Leaf tobacco.


Name of property type: Resources Associated With Transportation.
(The example is from the Industrial Resources of Huntingdon County MPS prepared by the Pennsylvania SHPO and emphasizes function and design completeness as key registration requirements.)

In order to qualify for listing, the transportation resources must have been used by the transportation industry or by another industry for the transportation of county produced goods or the transportation of raw materials and people. The properties must be intact examples of one of the identified subtypes; road resources, canal resources or railroad resources. Many bridges associated with roads or railroads have been maintained or replaced in situ before 1939 and are currently in use. Except where specified eligible transportation resources must have integrity of location, design, setting, materials and association.

Subtype: road resources Road bridges are eligible under Criterion A in the area of transportation if they served as important links in the local road network and in the transportation of goods, raw materials, or people within the county. The historic materials, form and setting of the bridge must be intact.

In order to be eligible under Criterion C in the area of engineering a bridge must be an example of a bridge design that was important in the construction of bridges in Huntingdon County. Those properties eligible for engineering significance should be considered even if alterations to form and materials exist so long as the significant engineering design is prominent and intact.

Subtype: canal resources The remains of canal right-of-way or structural components must be visually evident and any disturbance that may have occurred must not have compromised the potential for the site to yield information relevant to the historic use or engineering of the site. Canal resources must retain integrity of location, design, materials and association. Canal resources eligible under Criterion A must be associated with an important transportation route or industry in the county such as the Pennsylvania Canal. A portion of a canal right-of-way must retain the visual appearance of an earthen ditch in order to be considered for eligibility under Criterion A. For the same criterion, enough of the stone walls of a lock or dam must stand to represent the original function of the feature. Long planking which may have been associated with a canal resource need not remain in order for the resource to be considered for listing.

The abandonment of the canal has resulted in the natural deterioration of the individual components. In order to be eligible under Criterion D, a canal resource must be able to yield information on the historic functions or engineering of the canal. Canal resources must also retain original materials, setting, and configuration to be eligible under Criterion D.

subtype: railroad resources The historic right-of-way completed by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1850 for the most part is presently in use by Conrail, thus the significant features associated with the operation of the line have, by necessity, been subject to continuing maintenance, upkeep or replacement as necessary. Other railroad resources may be associated with local industry that operated rail lines as part of their operations such as the East Broad Top Railroad by the Rockhill Iron and Coal Company.

In order to be eligible in the area of transportation under Criterion A railroad resources must be an important link in the local railroad network or in the transportation of goods and people through or within Huntingdon County. In order to be eligible in the area of industry under Criterion A, railroad resources must be associated with a locally important industry such as the coal or coke industry. To be eligible in the area of engineering under Criterion C, railroad resources must be an example of a bridge or tunnel design that was important in the construction of bridges and tunnels in Huntingdon County; or be an example of engineering needed by railroad companies in overcoming mountainous terrain in western Pennsylvania. As part of the Pennsylvania Railroad's efforts to maintain or increase carrying capacity on bridges in Huntingdon County, the Pennsylvania Railroad reinforced bridges in Huntingdon County with concrete during the first decades of the twentieth century. The concrete reinforcing is considered as contributing to the historic significance of these bridges; this reinforcing enabled the Pennsylvania Railroad to continue its important role in local and regional transportation to 1939. Pennsylvania Railroad tunnels similarly remain eligible for the National Register even though two of the four tracks constructed at the turn of this century have been removed. The railroad track and bed remain eligible as long as the original alignment and grade of the bed and track have been maintained. The railroad track and bed are eligible even though ties and rails may have been replaced; such replacements are considered essential to the continuing operation of the railroad line. Railroad resources were evaluated at the local level.

Warehouses constructed by the Pennsylvania Railroad must retain their proximity to the right-of-way as well as their original design and construction material in order to be eligible under Criterion A for association with the transportation industry. They may also exemplify the use of the railroad by a significant historic industry. For railroad warehouses eligible under Criterion C for their engineering significance it is not necessary for them to retain their original location as long as an appropriate setting is provided and engineering features have been retained.

GEOGRAPHICAL DATA

G. Geographical Data

List all jurisdictions and geographical units or portions covered by the multiple property group, including the name of towns, cities, counties, townships, parishes, multiple counties, areas of counties, and areas of states or multiple states. The geographical data define the limits of the area where properties included within the multiple property group exist or are likely to exist. Define political boundaries, route numbers, road names, or topographical features as precisely as possible. Geographical data also may refer to section numbers, contour lines, or lines drawn between UTM reference points on USGS quadrangle maps. State if the area is coterminous with the limits of a political jurisdiction or area, for example, Yellowstone National Park or the incorporated limits of Columbus.

The geographical area covered by the multiple property listing should incorporate the area covered by its related historic contexts, but it does not need to have the same boundaries.

EXAMPLES

The State of Washington

The corporate limits of the village of Higginsport, Brown County, Ohio

The geographical area encompasses the 19 National Forests in the Pacific Northwest Region (region 6) located in Oregon and Washington

The salt pond region extends across the southern edge of Rhode Island. Located within Washington County, the area includes portions of Westerly, Charlestown, South Kingstown, and Narragansett. The eastern boundary is Route 108 in Narragansett; the western boundary is the Pawtucket River; the southern boundary is Block Island Sound; the northern boundary generally is U.S. Route 1. Exceptions to this northern boundary occur (1) at the intersection of U.S. Route 1 and Narrow Lane. The boundary at this intersection follows the 60 foot contour line north and west around Cross Mills Pond, and (2) at the intersection of U.S. Routes 1 and 1A in Westerly. At this intersection, the boundary turns southwest along Route 1A to the Pawtucket River shoreline immediately adjacent to intersections of Avondale Road and India Point Road.

SUMMARY OF IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION METHODS

H. Summary of Identification and Evaluation Methods (Discuss the methods used in developing the multiple property listing.)

Provide a concise explanation of the methods used to prepare the multiple property submission by answering the following questions:

  • How was the survey conducted and data collected? Include a discussion about methods, survey history, sampling techniques, survey procedures, archival research, and field survey.
  • How were the historic context(s) determined? Include information about the general approach for organizing data about the historic contexts, determining geographical area, and period of time.
  • On what were the significant property types based? Function, style, time period or historical period?
  • How were the requirements derived for integrity for the listing of member properties? Were they based on a knowledge of the condition of existing properties, on predictions derived from a study of historic land use, or on some other factors?

EXAMPLE OF IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION METHODS

The multiple property listing of historic and architectural resources of Granville County, North Carolina, is based upon a 1986 architectural resources inventory of the county, and a 1987 National Register nomination project, conducted by Marvin A. Brown and Patricia A. Esperon under the auspices of the Survey and Planning Branch of the North Carolina Division of Archives and History. The inventory identified more than 525 properties and groups of properties. Every passable road, public and private, leading to a known or suspected property was driven during the inventory and every building marked on the USGS topographical maps for the county was viewed. Properties from vernacular to high style were recorded, with emphasis given to age and rarity, and representativeness of types and styles. Every pre-Civil War property was recorded, as were the vast majority of properties predating the turn of the century. Those not recorded were passed over because of alterations that substantially damaged their integrity. Properties erected between 1900 and World War II were more selectively recorded, with emphasis given to the more unaltered, unusual or particularly representative ones. For each recorded property, locations were noted on USGS topographical maps; photographs were taken; computerized inventory forms were completed; research, including the checking of deeds and secondary sources and the taking of oral histories, was conducted; and narrative architectural and historical descriptions were written. This work was conducted on a full-time basis by Marvin Brown during 1986 and on a full-time basis for the last half of the year by Patricia Esperon. In 1987, both Brown and Esperon also worked full-time in the county, further researching the inventoried properties and drafting National Register nominations.

The properties are grouped under three historic contexts that conform with the three major themes that best define the county and its properties: (1) the plantation era between the founding of the county and the Civil War; (2) the influences of the raising of Bright Leaf tobacco on the development of rural Granville County between the Civil War and World War II; (3) and the influence of the Bright Leaf during those years on the development of the county seat of Oxford. The property types are organized chronologically by style and by function.

The survey identified a wide range of resources in the county spanning the years from the Revolutionary War to World War II. Integrity requirements were based upon a knowledge of existing properties. The architectural and physical features of the county's finer surviving properties, derived from the inventory, were considered in developing the outlines of potential registration requirements. The general statements about the lack of comprehensive integrity of many properties are based upon knowledge of the deteriorated condition and tenuous position of many of the county's rarest and most historically evocative and important properties. The total number of Granville County properties placed on the Study List for nomination to the National Register at the January 8, 1987, North Carolina Professional Review Committee meeting was 120 individual rural properties, five rural districts, one large Oxford historic district and five individual Oxford properties. Approximately 90 percent of these study list properties are dwellings and farms, with several grist mills, Masonic lodges, churches, tobacco manufactories and fraternal and commercial buildings making up the rest. The few nominated properties included with this multiple property nomination are the first phase of nominations. They were chosen because they are exceptional examples of important styles and types in the county and exceptionally evocative of historical ways of life in the county. The nominated properties were limited to a small selection of inventoried properties because of budgetary and time limitations imposed by the National Register project under which this work has been performed. Also because of budgetary and time constraints, the Historic District in Oxford was limited to the discrete core of the town's oldest, finest and most significant properties.

 

MAJOR BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES

I. Major Bibliographical References

(list major written works and primary location of additional documentation: State Historic Preservation Office, other State agency, Federal agency, local government, university, or other, specifying repository.)

Under this heading, list the major bibliographical references. Use a standard bibliographical style, such as that found in A Manual of Style or A Manual for Writers by Kate L. Turabian, both published by the University of Chicago Press. Include primary and secondary sources of information used in documenting the property types and the respective historic contexts. Do not include general reference works unless they provided specific information or assisted in evaluating and documenting related properties. Sources may include field surveys, theme studies, published histories, historic photographs and maps, oral histories, archeological surveys, folklife studies, and archival research in public and private records.

For surveys and inventories, the following are required:

  • The title
  • Dates
  • File number (if any)
  • The nature of the survey
  • The name of the sponsoring organization
  • The names and professions of the authors or persons conducting the survey

Lastly, identify the primary location where additional documentation is stored.

GUIDELINES FOR BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES

  • For all printed materials, list the author, full title, location and ate of publication, and publisher.
  • For articles, list also the name, volume, and date of the journal or magazine.
  • For unpublished manuscripts, indicate where copies are available.
  • For interviews, include the date of the interview, name of the interviewer, name and title of the person interviewed, and, if taped, location where the tape or transcript is stored.
  • Cite any established historic contexts that have been used to evaluate the property.

 

EXAMPLES

Intensive architectural inventory of Granville County, North Carolina, conducted in 1986 by Marvin A. Brown, architectural historian, and Patricia A. Esperon, historian, and supervised by Davyd Foard Hood, state historic preservation officer. Files located at Survey and Planning Branch, North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Caldwell, James R., Jr. "A History of Granville County, North Carolina: The Preliminary Phase, 1746-1900." Ph.D. Thesis, University of North Carolina, 1950.

Johnson, Guion Griffin. Antebellum North Carolina: A Social History. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1937.

Tilley, Nannie May. "Industries of Colonial Granville County," North Carolina Historical Review, Vol. 13, No. 4 (October 1936), pp. 273-289.

ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION

National Register Continuation Sheets

Continuation sheets (10-900-a) or a computer-generated form are used to enter all required information for section E through I on the Multiple Property Documentation Form (NPS 10-900-b). Type the name of the multiple property listing, letter of the section being continued, and page number for that section in the space provided at the top of each sheet. If a single sheet is used to continue several sections, information should be organized alphabetically according to section letters. If one or more sheets are needed to continue a section, number each sheet according to the letter of the section being continued.


GUIDELINES FOR CONTINUATION SHEETS

  • On each continuation sheet, enter the following information:

1. Name of the property listing, section, and page number at the top of the form and

2. A heading for each item with the corresponding information.

  • Information for several sections may be placed on one continuation sheet. In this case,
  • enter section letters at the top of each page. Enter the information in sequence by section.


National Register Registration Forms

Submit one completed National Register Registration Form for each property to be registered as part of the multiple property listing. Complete the form according to the instructions found in National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form. In addition, enter in the space provided in section 5 the name of the multiple property listing as it appears in section A of the multiple property form. In section 9, Major Bibliographical References, enter only those references supplementing the list provided in Section I of the Multiple Property Documentation Form or that specifically mention the individual property.

Photographs and Maps

Photographs and maps are generally not submitted with the cover form, but are submitted with the individual property forms and should meet the requirements for documentation accompanying them. However, if several of the properties being registered are located in the same USGS quadrant, the UTM references and locations of each can be marked on a single USGS map included in the submission. Likewise, if several properties are in the same general location and a city tax map, USGS, or plat map is used to indicate property boundaries in place of a verbal boundary description, a single map identifying the boundaries of each property may be included, provided section 10 of each registration form references the map. If such maps are also used for a sketch map, the boundaries and other information of several properties may be indicated on a single area map included in the submission, provided each registration form references the map.

IV: Compiling Multiple Property Submissions

In a sequence, compile the multiple property submission to include the following:

  • Completed Multiple Property Documentation Form and its continuation sheets.
  • Individual National Register Registration Forms for each property, if submitted at the same time.

V. Amending Multiple Property Submissions

Because the multiple property format is designed as a flexible tool, the multiple property listing may be revised, refined, and expanded as new information is gathered, new properties are identified, and changed in the condition of related property types are observed.

Completed registration forms for related properties may be submitted to the National Register at the same time or after the multiple property form has been submitted, provided all the procedures and requirements set forth in 36 CFR Part 60 have been met.

Documentation on the multiple property form may also be updated, revised, and added to at any time upon the request of the State or Federal Historic Preservation officer. Changes may be made by:

  • Submitting additional information or new continuation sheets, or
  • Providing a replacement form or individual sheets where substantial changes are made in the text.

Continuation sheets and replacement forms, as well as any requests for the removal of listed properties must be certified by the Federal or State Historic Preservation Officer and submitted according to the procedures outlined in the National Register regulations.

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